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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I can see that the clutch has opened when the petal is depressed, but the driveshaft is still spinning. For a lack of a better term does the "throwout bearing"need to be lubricated, if so how? Or do I need to disassemble and cleaned?
 

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I can see that the clutch has opened when the petal is depressed, but the driveshaft is still spinning.
The clutch pulley has fiber facings bonded to each side. ....When the clutch pedal is pressed down, the clutch facings on both sides need to be free from their mating faces.

As Brian said, sometimes one facing is "stuck" to its mating part, or maybe the clutch needs adjustment.

If both faces are away from their mating parts when the clutch is down, and the driveshaft still spins, the needle bearings in the clutch pulley may be seized.

There are other possibilities as well. ...The clutch yokes may be worn, clutch adjustment may be needed, the brake facing may be worn or missing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Is the clutch free on both sides when you push the petal down?

sometimes they will stick together, try a wooden mallet and see if it breaks free
What you are describing "both sides" is something I am not seeing at the time. I will look closer. Sounds like this would be an easy fix. The clutch worked fine when I picked up the tractor 2 weeks ago.
 

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Here are pictures of what the clutch pieces look like in a 1050 that may help. As stated the lining on the pulley could be stuck to one of the plate faces, the needle bearings could be seized or something else may be wrong or something may be out of adjustment.
 

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Since you said you can see it open, my guess is the needle bearings, located in the sheave are your problem. The grease in the needle bearings on mine dried out and caused the bearing to lock up. I was able to take it apart, clean out all the dried grease and get it rolling again. This was over a year ago and it still running fine. This is my main workhorse around here for cutting grass and garden work.

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Here are pictures of what the clutch pieces look like in a 1050 that may help. As stated the lining on the pulley could be stuck to one of the plate faces, the needle bearings could be seized or something else may be wrong or something may be out of adjustment.
WOW! That will really help! Thanks for the pic's
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Since you said you can see it open, my guess is the needle bearings, located in the sheave are your problem. The grease in the needle bearings on mine dried out and caused the bearing to lock up. I was able to take it apart, clean out all the dried grease and get it rolling again. This was over a year ago and it still running fine. This is my main workhorse around here for cutting grass and garden work.

Jim
There seems to be a consensus here, pointing to dried out needle bearings. Makes since to me. This 1050 is my new acquire and is next for restoring. SO - the advice provided here and the pictures from 29 Chev will really help with my endeavor!! THANKS!
 

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Those reference pictures are great. BTW the restoration on that tractor must be amazing based on your pictures.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Those reference pictures are great. BTW the restoration on that tractor must be amazing based on your pictures.
I agree! Everything looks meticulously fresh! Anything that can wear out has been replaced, even the bolts are new. Like I said before - WOW!
 

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Forgot to post a picture of the needle bearings installed inside the pulley and the sleeve they run on when the clutch is disengaged. If you disassemble the clutch I would suggest you make sure the needles turn inside the cage in case someone has had the unit apart and damaged or installed them incorrectly - the needles should be parallel to the bore. Sometimes they get on an angle to the cage if someone is installing them and is not careful and then they will bind and not rotate properly - you can use a small flat screwdriver or a pick to make sure they rotate freely. I would also suggest you lubricate them with fresh grease before you reassemble the unit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Here are pictures of what the clutch pieces look like in a 1050 that may help. As stated the lining on the pulley could be stuck to one of the plate faces, the needle bearings could be seized or something else may be wrong or something may be out of adjustment.
Hi 29 Chev, The clutch assembly pictures you provided have helped immensely! Without them I probably would have painted myself into a corner. The exploded diagrams that are available help, but your pictures fill in the gaps. At this time I have re-assembled the clutch with some new parts and am ready to put the assembly back in the tractor. I do have a question for you. The pictures of your clutch show friction disks on both sides of the oblong brake plate. Is this needed? The diagrams don't show 2 friction disks. Is there a benefit to having 2 friction disks? Just curious! Thanks Again for the pictures! Paul
 

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Hi 29 Chev, The clutch assembly pictures you provided have helped immensely! Without them I probably would have painted myself into a corner. The exploded diagrams that are available help, but your pictures fill in the gaps. At this time I have re-assembled the clutch with some new parts and am ready to put the assembly back in the tractor. I do have a question for you. The pictures of your clutch show friction disks on both sides of the oblong brake plate. Is this needed? The diagrams don't show 2 friction disks. Is there a benefit to having 2 friction disks? Just curious! Thanks Again for the pictures! Paul
Glad to hear you are making progress.

The brake plate would normally only have friction material on one side of the plate. What happened was when I sent the clutch pulley and brake plate away to a brake rebuilder here in Canada to have new friction material installed the rebuilder put a friction disc on both sides of the plate in error thinking that it should have material on both faces the same as the pulley. Since the only way to remove the material would have been to grind it off (according to the rebuilder) I ended up removing just a small amount in the area where the release bearing arms are so they would clear and left the rest of the material on the back side alone. That way if the lining on the front ever wears out or comes loose I can just flip the brake plate over and use the back side and have a new surface for the rear clutch hub to mate with - hated to destroy good friction material when it was already bonded on.
 
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