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Anything Red . . .
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When some guy at a stoplight challenges you to a race, you just have to excuse yourself to change the clip? :thumbs: :D
 

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tinkerer
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When some guy at a stoplight challenges you to a race, you just have to excuse yourself to change the clip? :thumbs: :D
I'm old enough to know better then to do my racing on the street.

We have a quarter mile drag strip handy where we can handle that.
 

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Mark J.
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Can you talk a little about the manifold that the carbs mount to? Who makes it ex....
 
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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
Can you talk a little about the manifold that the carbs mount to? Who makes it ex....
That is a cast aluminum manifold made by Weiand in the 50's and 60's to mount four, 3-bolt ford - 48 or 94 carbs or Stromberg - 97 carbs on a 471 blower.

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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
Rubber from an old inner tube is glued to the surface of the mounting flange on the gas tank for the right side.

Rubber is also glued to the inside of the tank where it will ride up against the side of the frame rail.

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The gas tank is then mounted in place.

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I cut pieces off an old hydraulic hose and put them on the bolts that go thru the top of the mounting flange.

These bolts are threaded into the mounting bracket so they can be snugged down just enough to keep the tank in place without clamping the mounting flanges tight to the frame.

Then lock nuts are threaded up on the underside of the bolts so they will not loosen up.

With the mounting flanges mounted in rubber, it allows the tank flanges to move a little to prevent stress cracks from forming in the metal later on.

The rubber also insulates the aluminum tank from the steel frame so oxidation wont form between the two metals.

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The 1-3/4 diameter fill tube is connected to the diverter can, under the car,with a fuel resistant rubber hose.

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The sending unit for the gas gauge is mounted in the back end of the tank for the left side.

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And then the tank is mounted on the left side.

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The fill tube for this tank is also connected to the diverter can.

This will allow both tanks to fill and empty evenly at the same time and the two tanks should have about 22 gallons capacity.

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This is the gas fill neck that I made up years ago. It has a 3/4 inch diameter tube that will connect to the 3/4 inch tube at the top of each tank so air can escape quickly while the tanks are being filled.

The smaller tube is the air vent so the tanks will not build up pressure.

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This is the fuel fill door on the drivers side of the trunk.

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Open it up and the fill neck is right there.

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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
This is the pipe that will connect the 3/4 inch vent pipes on each gas tank and connect to the vent pipe on the gas filler tube.

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Looking at the installed vent pipe from over the rear axle.

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The last thing to put on is the 1-3/4 inch hose between the filler neck and the top of the distribution can.

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Super Moderator
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Nice! Well thought out installation.
 
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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
Fitting the exhaust manifolds onto the engine.

The heads on this engine hang out over the frame rails and in order to be able to get the manifold in and out without lifting the engine, I had to split it into two pieces.

Each one has to be twisted a little in order to get it in place.

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Looking up from underneath, at the outlet tubes of the two manifolds.

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The exhaust outlet tubes extend down past the mounting flange.

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Those two outlet tubes fit down into the two holes in this header pipe.

With them countersunk this way there is less chance of the flange gasket blowing out.

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This header pipe is bolted onto the bottom of the two exhaust manifolds.

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Then the rest of the exhaust is fit into place.

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The muffler has the inlet in the center and the outlet over to one side.

It sits at an angle so the outlet is below the underside of the running board brackets.

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I used part of an exhaust header to make up the four tail pipes coming out from under the back of the running board.

There is an exhaust hanger holding the front of this pipe up where it attaches to the muffler.

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And a bolt and lock nut with a spring on it to keep the back of the pipe in place. This allows the exhaust system to flex a little.

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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #49 ·
I have a power brake unit mounted under the body and when I went to hook up the vacuum line, I realized there isn't a place to hook it up to.

The small vacuum line for the distributor comes off the port on the carburetor but there isn't a large vacuum port in the Weiand intake manifold on top of the blower.

You would think I would have realized that before I bolted it on top of the blower and fastened the carbs, linkage and fuel lines all up ... but obviously I didn't.

So .. it's time to pull the intake manifold back off so I can drill and tap it for a vacuum port.

The Weiand manifold is bolted onto the blower with four bolts. The left rear carb and the right front carb have a hidden mounting bolt under each of them but I can't get to all of the carb mounting bolts on those two carbs unless I remove the right rear carb first.

With that carb off, I then have room to use the allen wrench to remove the back center bolt on the right front carb.

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Then I can reach the front inside nuts on the two left carbs.

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Technically, with the left rear carb removed, I can now reach both of the hidden bolts so the manifold could be removed without removing the left front carb from it.

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However, because I'm going to be working on this manifold, I went ahead and removed the last carb.

Here is what the bare Weiand manifold looks like.

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And a look at the bottom side.

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The manifold is clamped in the drill press to drill and tap the hole in the back side.

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The manifold is re-mounted on the blower and the carbs are bolted back on in the reverse order that they were removed.

I'm using a chrome plated copper line, that is used for plumbing sink faucets in houses, for the vacuum line.

Here the first bend is being formed in it.

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The line runs down the back of the blower and over between the oil dipstick and the distributor in the lower right corner of the photo.

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tinkerer
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Time to do some work on the inside.

This model-T body is only 45 inches wide on the inside. I have a pair of small bucket seats that are only 20 inch wide so they will fit inside and still leave room in between them for an emergency brake handle.

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I need to cut a piece of plywood for the seat base to fit on top of the metal model -T seat frame. when I was working on this back in the late 90's, I had made a cardboard pattern for the seat base and the silly thing is still good enough to use after all these years.

Here it is sitting on top of the original metal seat frame. The battery and the master cylinder for the brakes are mounted under the floor board so I need to be able to get under the seats to access them. This also leaves storage space under the seats and I'm going to get a couple of square plastic containers that will fit in the two cutout spaces to use for storage. They will keep everything from sliding around under there and I can just lift them out when I need to get to the battery or master cylinder.

Also in this photo .. there are white lines drawn on the metal of the back of the body. I'm going to cut this metal out and make this area behind the seats part of the trunk space.

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The metal is cut out between the cab and the trunk.

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Here is how it looks from the trunk.

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The pattern is set on a piece of plywood ready for tracing around it.

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The back of the seat base is cut to size leaving extra on the front sides. Then the seat base is set in place and the two seats are placed on it to determine where to trim the front sides.

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The finished seat base is bolted in place with 1/4 inch counter sunk flat head bolts.

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The area at the back between the underside of the seat base and the floor is closed in ( this is now trunk area ).

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These seats have a solid frame work so the backs do not fold forward. In order to make it so I can access the area under the seats easily, I'm going to have to cut the seat frames and separate the backs from the bottoms. The backs will be bolted in place and the bottoms will be easily removable by sliding them in and out.

I'm going to enclose the area behind the seats with a piece of plywood that will fit from the seat base up to the underside of the rear window to separate the cab area from the trunk area and the back's of the seats will fit up tight to this plywood.

The sides for this enclosure have to be made first.

Here is the left side piece. It is fit to the floor and the back of the body but There is extra wood left on the front so I can fit the front piece to them later.

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And the right side is fit into place. The two black lines going into the holes above the opening are 3 - wire electrical cables for the tail lights, brake lights and turn signals. They are running thru steel tubes that are welded to the inside of the trunk for extra support around the trunk lid opening.

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tinkerer
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This piece of wood took me a little time to figure out how to design it and how to cut it out.

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It fills in the area under the rear window.

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With that piece fastened in place, I can figure out where to mark a line on the two side pieces where the back of the seat back board will be.

The extra wood is cut off along that line and the two side pieces are fastened in place.

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And finally the piece of plywood for the seat back is fastened in place.

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This is how the inside of the trunk looks. The area is extended 7 inches farther forward now.

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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
The bucket seats are cut in two so I now have an individual seat bottom and a seat back.

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The front mounting holes on the seat bottom have locator pins screwed into them.

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There are holes drilled into the wood seat base that these pins fit thru. The hole for the pin on the other side of this seat is located behind the metal seat riser.

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The material is cut on the seat back and it is tucked in and glued tight around steel tube seat frame.

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I bent up an upper mounting bracket out of thick sheet metal that fits in under the seat frame.

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Both seat bottoms are positioned on the seat base.

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The seat back is set in place and I marked where the upper mounting bracket needs to be placed.

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I removed the seat back and screwed the upper mounting bracket in place.

This bracket is mounted 1/8 inch higher then the location of the marks that I had made on the wood seat back.

That way the seat back is held up high enough so the two cut ends of the steel tube seat frame don't rub together.

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The two steel frame tubes sticking out from the bottom of the seat back have holes drilled into them to fasten them to the plywood behind the seat back.

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This seat back is hung in place on the mounting bracket.

I purchased a upholstery hog ring kit off ebay and I'm waiting for it to be delivered so I can fasten the extra material up under the seat back before I finish screwing it to the plywood.

You can see that I have fastened small metal pieces to the front of the wood bottom seat base. These are mounted over the holes for the locator pins so the pins don't wear the holes out in the wood.

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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
Back when I made the post on adding a pressure cap to the radiator, I had shown you this photo of the original, un-pressurised, winged radiator cap with the Motometer on it.

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The fill hole in the radiator under this cap is sealed off so this cap is now just a dummy for decoration.

The glass is broken on one side of the Motometer but that glass is still available and easily replaced.

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There are thousands of model - T and model - A cars and trucks out there with the exact same Motometer gauge on their radiator so I decided to remove my gauge from the wings and put something else on it. Like most everything else on this project, I wanted it to be different from what everyone else has.

I bought this brass figuring off ebay to replace the Motometer.

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Most of the body was cut off and the head and neck are soldered onto the wings to form my new dummy radiator cap.

This is my .......... " T-bird " ............

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tinkerer
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Sometimes fixing one thing causes a problem with something else and that's what happened when I put a harmonic balancer from a newer engine on this old Hemi engine.

Somewhere I had read that you could run a blower engine without a harmonic balancer because the blower drive belt would absorb the static vibration like a harmonic balancer does so I had initially put this together without a harmonic balancer.

Because this is a full fender car, it has always been my intention to keep everything inside the frame rails that are only as wide as a stock Ford model - T. That has been somewhat of a challenge considering that the heads on the Hemi engine are wider then the outside of the frame.

A regular radiator hose connected to the water pump would have hung out over the top of the frame rails and I didn't want that.

So ..by not running a harmonic balancer, I was able to make up an aluminum tube that connected to the inlet on the water pump and ran down the front of the engine between the power steering pump and the timing chain cover.

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The bottom of this tube connected to the outlet tube on the bottom of the radiator.

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As you can see here, the red harmonic balancer is right where the inlet tub use to be.

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So I need to change the location of the inlet tube for the water pump. I start by cutting a top section off the tube.

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After figuring out where to run the new tube, I started welding a piece of aluminum pipe to it.

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This is the new finished water inlet tube.

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It now runs down behind the power steering pump.

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And comes out under the power steering pump, pointing forward toward the radiator. A flexible radiator hose about 14 inch long will connect this with the outlet on the radiator.

This is the lowest point in the cooling system so the drain plug is in this pipe.

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Here's how the new cap looks mounted on the radiator.

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Mark J.
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Hopefully you don't have to make many more changes. I don't think you will have to room to change anything else.

Love the rad cap.
 
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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #56 ·
I had built a dash for this car that held this speedometer and used " idiot lights " for the electrical charging, oil pressure and water temperature indicators.

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I have changed my mind and I'm going to build a new dash that will use these more nostalgic type of gauges.

.... the gauges are all the same diameter, the gas gauge looks bigger because the face is closer to the camera and pointing more up at it. .....

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Along with changing the gauges, I have also gotten rid of the power windows, power trunk lid and power slide on the steering column so the whole wiring system needs to be re-configured.

I have pulled the fuse panel out of the car and here is what I'm starting with for my re-wiring.

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I've started on the new wiring with mounting the ignition coil on the firewall.

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The control box for the electronic distributor, the ballast resister for the coil and the horn relay are mounted on the inside by the plastic base for the fuse panel.

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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #57 ·
The piece of metal is cut to size for making the new dash and a quarter inch lip is bent up along one side that will fit up under the windshield frame.

When I built my sheet metal brake, I made up a pipe that bolts to it so I can make radius bends and I'm using that to form a radius along the top of the dash panel.

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I also used the pipe to form a slight curve along the bottom of the dash.

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The bottom of the dash is curved to fit these four bezels that came off a mid 50's Ford dash.

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The dash panel is put in place for it's first trial fit and to figure out how far I want the bottom of the dash to stick out from the lower crossbar.

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The bottom part of the dash is bent up and it has a thicker strip of steel welded to it with two locating pins and three 1/4-20 threaded holes for bolting the dash to the lower crossbar.

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This is bolted in place on the lower crossbar.

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Then the dash panel is set in place the the bottom sections are temporally fastened together with screws.

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A thin strip of metal is temporarily fastened to the back corner on each side so the dash panel won't spread apart when I remove it from the car.

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This is ready to have the bottom pieces welded together and to have the two end pieces made up and welded to it.

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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #58 ·
The ends of the dash are finished and it's time for another test fit.

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While it is in the car, I marked where the speedometer go.

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The hole for the speedometer is finished.

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The dash goes back in to make sure that the speedometer fits. I had to trim a little of the wood out under the windshield frame to get the speedometer to go in all the way.

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The holes for the other gauges are drilled out and 1/4 inch locator holes are drilled for the 8 holes for the control switches and cables.

I'm thinking of cutting out a section on the right side of the dash and put in a glove box with a lid that opens and closes.

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With the clearance holes drilled out for the controls, I now have a dash full of holes.

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There are two stamped backing plates that go behind the dash with particular size and shaped holes for locating the individual control switches and cables.

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Seen from the back side, there is a hole in the center of each one for a dash light socket and bulb.

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Those bulbs will make the letters on each of these plastic bezels light up at night.

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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #59 ·
The glove box door panel is cut out of the dash and a piece of piano hinge is welded to the bottom edge.

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The bottom of the dash is drilled and tapped so the other side of the hinge can be screwed to it.

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here is the dash so far with the glove box door attached to it.

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I took four strips of sheet metal and bent them lengthwise at a 90 degree angle. These strips will welded together to form a " Z " channel for each side of the glove box opening.

Here I'm punching holes in one of the strips so it can be spot welded to one of the other strips.

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Before I weld the strips together, I make sure that the front piece fits properly on each side of the opening.

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Then the back strip is welded on to form a side panel.

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I have this pair of old glove box door stops that I'm going to use so the door doesn't open too far.

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I need to mill a slot in each of the side panels for these door stops to slide thru.

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The two side panels are welded to the dash.

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Super Moderator
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Beautiful work, Ray! Wish I was half that good!
 
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