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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #61 ·
I'm using my tube bender to form a radius in a piece of 1/4 inch square steel rod.

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This is formed to fit on the inside of the glove box door.

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The two pieces of square steel are welded to the side of the glove box door.

Then another straight piece of square steel was fit across the two front ends of the square steel rods and welded in place.

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I cut out a piece of sheet metal to fit over these square steel rods and I'm using my metal roller to form the radius in it.

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The piece is bent along one edge and holes are punched into it for welding.

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This piece of sheet metal is then welded to the inside of the glove box door.

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Here's how it looks with the door closed.

The welding leaves little pock marks on the finished surface of the dash and they will all be filled in with glazing putty later.

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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #62 ·
I machined out two small blocks of aluminum to mount the two glove box door stop brackets to.

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Each of these are fastened to the inside of the glove box door with two countersunk flathead screws.

The door stop brackets are then attached to them.

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Here is how the brackets look from the back side with the glove box door closed.

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A 3/4 inch hole is drilled thru the top of the glove box door and a notch is milled out with a 1/16" diameter endmill.

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This hole is for the door latch.

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Here is how the latch look on the back side.

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Next I machined some angled surfaces on a small block of brass.

Then I soldered that block onto a flat piece of brass to form the striker plate for the door latch.

I also drilled and tapped the back side of this for a #4-40 countersunk screw to make sure that this solder joint doesn't ever come loose.

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This has two slots machined into it for the adjustment on the mounting screws.

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This striker plate is attached to the top of the glove box opening.

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This is how everything fits together when the glove box door is closed.

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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #63 ·
Machined up some parts out of brass today.

The smaller round tubes have a hole drilled half way into them and the other half of the part is drilled and tapped for a #8-32 thread.

The larger round tubes are capped on one end with a clearance hole for a #8 screw.

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This is the hardware that will go with these parts.

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The large round tubes are soldered onto the flat strips.

Then the parts are assembled in this order.

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This makes up two little spring loaded plungers.

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The plungers are mounted to the top of the glove box opening.

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With the glove box door closed, the plungers are compressed in about 3/16 inch.

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When I push the latch button to open the glove box, the two plungers push the door open this far.

From this point, the weight of the door makes it open the rest of the way.

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A Little Off Plumb
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Beautiful work. Something that might have also worked instead of the plungers might have been a door jam switch as they are spring loaded and might have given you the added benefit of having a switch for a glove compartment light if required - only a suggestion.
 

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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #65 ·
Beautiful work. Something that might have also worked instead of the plungers might have been a door jam switch as they are spring loaded and might have given you the added benefit of having a switch for a glove compartment light if required - only a suggestion.
That is a good suggestion .. however, the springs on a door jam switch are not strong enough to over ride the pressure needed to push the button in to release the latch.

I have a regular glove box light but I'm probably not going to use it.

The glove box can't be very deep so a light isn't really needed.

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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #66 ·
Going thru some old picture albums and I ran across some more photos that were taken back when I was first working on this.

Fitting the fenders and bending up the running boards.

0011.jpg

Then setting the splash apron in place.

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Here I'm starting to fit the trunk pieces together.

..... Note the leaf spring suspension on the rear axle. .....

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Welding the 1 inch square tube framework inside the trunk.

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Making the outer frame for the trunk lid.

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This is the finished trunk lid.

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I had decided to go with a coil spring rear suspension instead so the leaf springs were removed.

This is the two lower control arms for the rear axle with a sway bar fastened to the two of them.

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The rear axle is installed and I'm getting ready to make the top mounts for the coil springs.

..... Note the rear axle now has the quick change housing mounted to it.

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The top spring mounts are finished.

You can see the two upper axle control arms showing just under the frame.

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This view show the two upper control arms running from the center axle housing out to the frame rails on each side.

The upper control arms keep the rear axle centered and also keep it from rocking forward or backward.

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tinkerer
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The dash is painted with the gauges installed and I'm fitting the switches and cables in place.

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Of course the original switches from the 53 Ford dash are easily fastened right in place to complete the dash.

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With the switches on the left side, the top left was original a cable for opening an outside air vent.

It is now going to be a push - pull electrical switch for turning the power on and off for the transmission overdrive lockup solenoid. The round red light on the far left will light up when the power is on for the transmission switch.

I have to make a special bezel nut to fasten this switch into this hole and I have to cut the knob off the air vent cable and drill and tap it to fit the electrical switch.

The lower right switch on this group is for the electric windshield wipers and the original switch had two speeds.

I have a newer wiper motor on this that has a variable intermittent cycle and I have to modify the original knob to fit this new wiper switch.

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Here is a closer view of the controls.

That top left bezel originally said " AIR ". I masked over the " I " and panted over the other two letters.

When the headlights are turned on, there is a thin ring around the back of each of the eight bezels that lights up and the letters themselves light up.

This transmission switch will have the ring and just the little vertical line light up.

Under the speedometer there are the turn signal indicators and the bright headlight indicator.

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Super Moderator
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I like that, Ray! I had a '53 Ford long ago!
 
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Mark J.
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Turned out great from where I'm sitting.
 
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tinkerer
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Ummmh . . . Ray, I think you got your Lindeman mixed up with your T.
By golly you're right. That explains why the update on the Lindeman post wasn't there when I went back to check it later and I had to put it in again.

I cleared that post out.
 

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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #74 ·
I have managed to get the dash wiring completed and mounted the dash in the car..

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This gives you an idea of how it will look at night with the dash lights on.

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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #75 ·
With spring being here, I'm back to work on the model-T

The wiring for the headlights is run thru the conduit tube that is on the front fender braces.

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The transmission cooler is mounted in place between the front frame rails.

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A long time ago, I had made up a cover out of aluminum to fit over the front frame rails.

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The wiring for the alternator is run up the outside of the frame and is ready to attach to the alternator.

The alternator can't be mounted until after the timing is set on the distributor because it blocks the timing mark for the crankshaft.

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The two windshield wipers are operated by a cable that goes back to the wiper motor under the passengers seat.

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I made up a sheet metal panel to cover the wiper assembly.

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The heater is mounted in place with the hoses and wiring run to it.

The wiring that is showing going down the inside of the cowl will be covered by the upholstery panel.

You can see the groove at the edge of the floor that the bottom of the upholstery panel will fit into.

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The fuse box is mounted in place and most of the wiring is completed.

The coils of wiring that you see inside both sides of the cowl are for the front turn signals, the horn and the front parking lights.

The wires will be run to these items later as they are installed on the car.

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The dash is completed with the wiring being done while the dash was still on the workbench.

There are connector plugs that will connect this wiring to the cars wiring when the dash is installed.

I still need to figure out where the hole needs to be drilled thru the firewall for the choke cable to run thru.

I also need to mount a gas pedal and run the linkage out to the throttle lever on the back of the blower.

I want to do both of these before I install the dash so that I have a clearer area to work with.

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Once I get the dash installed, I will get it running and that is as far as I'm going to go with it.

I'm going to then put this up for sale and whoever buys it can finish it.
 

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tinkerer
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The gas pedal is made up and mounted in the car.

I also put the rubber pad onto the brake arm.

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The gas pedal is connected to the throttle linkage on the back of the blower with a cable coming out of the firewall.

The throttle return springs are installed on the linkage on the side of the carbs.

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Sitting in the drivers seat ... this is the position of the throttle linkage at idle.

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And the linkage with the gas pedal pressed all the way down.

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Previously .... this red linkage rod had two holes in it for the clip pin so I could set these two carbs to not open at full throttle.

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After discussing this with my resident speed enthusiast ( my son ), he convinced me that these two carbs need to open all the time for full throttle running so that the engine doesn't lean out.

So I cut the front part of this linkage rod off and put in a fixed cotter pin so these two carbs will always go full open with the other two carbs at full throttle.

This is idle position.

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And full throttle position.

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The carburetors are Ford - 94 carbs made from 1950 thru 1953.

They are 170 CFM each and that equals 680 CFM at full throttle.

My so has a 1969 Firebird that runs in the 11's in the quarter in the 110 - 120 MPH range, running premium street gas.

With the exception of having cylinder boring done, he has built this whole car and engine himself.

He also drives this car regularly on the street.

I had posted this before but I'm going to post the link again for those who have not seen it.

This video was taken in 2014 at a test and tune night at the Edgewater drag strip in south west corner of Ohio.

Click on the bottom left corner ( Watch on U-tube )

 

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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #77 ·
Woops .... my son's car is a 68 ( not a 69 ).
 

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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #78 ·
I made a mounting bracket that fits on the back carburetor to clamp the choke cable housing to.

The wire goes to the choke lever on both of the carbs on the right side.

The two carbs on the other side do not have choke plates in them. They are set up so the throttle plates go completely closed and there is no idle circuit.

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There is spark at the coil so all I'm waiting on is for my son to get my valve covers back to me.

I am so close to running and last night the Gremlins got to it.

Today the electric fuel pump quit working. This was a new pump ( a little over 30 years ago ).

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Then the starter solenoid quit working.

I have a fuel pump ordered and it should be here Thursday. I'm going into Napa tomorrow to get a solenoid.

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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #79 · (Edited)
It has been 6 years now since we moved down here and I'm still opening boxes that haven't seen the light of day in over 30 years.

When I was first building this street-rod, I had taken it to a local car show and I had made up a display board with photos of it's construction.

I found that display board and it has a couple of photos that I don't have copies of in my scrapbook so you haven't seen them before.

Model - T.jpg


These are of how I built the intake manifold.

Model - T intake.jpg
 

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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #80 · (Edited)
Finally ... an update on the model-T !

I got it running about three weeks ago and the first time that I revved it up a little, it shot oil half way across the garage.
It turned out that the pressure relief valve was in the oil pump was stuck and it blew the top off of the oil filter.

I ended up machining adapter out of a block of aluminum and bolting a new Chrysler 340 high volume oil pump to the engine.
The stock oil pickup tube for the 340 pump sits too low so I made up another adapter out of brass and put a Chevy oil pickup tube on it.
The bottom of the pickup tube sits about 1/2 inch off the bottom of the oil pan.
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At about 8:30 this evening, I started it up again and it didn't spray oil all over the garage this time.
I'm using 20-50 oil with zink and with the engine cold, it runs a steady 70 pounds pressure with the engine revved up some.

I don't have antifreeze in it yet so I didn't want to run it too long.
The distributor hasn't been set with a timing light yet and it doesn't idle so I'll need to spend some time adjusting the carbs.
Once I get it all dialed in, I'll take a video of it running for you guys.
 
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