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I'm getting ready to but a lawn mower. My yard isn't huge, but big enough to need a riding mower. The back yard is pretty much a hill. It is cuttable, as when the house was vacant, a commercial landscape company cut it, and pretty sure by looking at the lawn they didn't puch mow it...
My budget is fairly low, just looking at the standard and am wondering if I should look at anything in particular between the models that would do better on the hills.
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Depends on how steep. Either way I'd be looking for an older one. Newer ones the transmissions are crap which is exaggerated even more so by running on hills.
I'd be looking for something like an older Cub, or Wheel horse or Deere, my preference on hills would be a gear trans rather than the hydro.
So look at honest to goodness GARDEN tractors not "LAWN" tractors as the garden tractors are built better, sturdier and parts for 40-50-ish year old machines even, most wear parts are still available for. Not saying you "have to" necessarily go that old to get a good machine but remember that old tractor will probably still be mowing, long after a new one bought today from your favorite box store has gone to crap.

On things like gauge wheels, blades, belts, bearings, etc//
many, if not most cases, on these older machines, you don't have to buy exactly OEM anyway, the aftermarket ones you buy may well have been who the company sourced the original parts from to begin with!!!!
 

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Agreed with the above answer but will add that my son has a White GT H2550 , nice tractor but the hydro is belt driven cutting up and down the small hill along his pond really taxes that belt end hydro where as my John Deere 318 is driveshaft to the hydro and has no issues . Also on the JD it has individual rear brakes so mower across hills you can slightly applie the brakes on the upper side to keep the wheel from spinning .
 

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A lot will depend on that slope. Yes, a lot of older equipment will give more satisfaction. What to get depends on whats available in your neck of the woods!
 
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If you are looking for something like these, make sure it has a low center of gravity, a pressure lube engine, a tough transaxle, steering brakes or lockers, and power steering. Outfit it with rib front tires, HDAP rear tires, and have those filled with RimGuard to lower your center of gravity even more.
 

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I'm getting ready to but a lawn mower. My yard isn't huge, but big enough to need a riding mower. The back yard is pretty much a hill. It is cuttable, as when the house was vacant, a commercial landscape company cut it, and pretty sure by looking at the lawn they didn't puch mow it... My budget is fairly low, just looking at the standard and am wondering if I should look at anything in particular between the models that would do better on the hills. Thanks
This is the best opinion for you! I think this is the best lawnmower
 

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Agreed with the above answer but will add that my son has a White GT H2550 , nice tractor but the hydro is belt driven cutting up and down the small hill along his pond really taxes that belt end hydro where as my John Deere 318 is driveshaft to the hydro and has no issues . Also on the JD it has individual rear brakes so mower across hills you can slightly applie the brakes on the upper side to keep the wheel from spinning .
A 1000 lb GT will be hard pressed to require as much as 8 hp to the rear wheels while mowing a steep slope. A properly tensioned A-section V- belt will deliver up to 15 hp.

The MF1655 uses a matched pair of V-belts to turn the drive shaft that powers the hydro and both the belts and drive shaft will survive an over-power that will break the differential.

In GTs, there is little difference between the effectiveness of belt drives and shaft drives. Belts take a bit more effort to maintain belt tension, but they are cheap to replace. Drive shafts need less maintenance but are much more costly to replace.
 
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