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The Tractor looks terrific! ;)

Thanks for taking the time to document all of the details, and work involved.

You certainly must be excited, I would be!!!! "She's a beut Clark"
 
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Thank you for all the kind words.

I started to take the transmission apart today in hopes of replacing the three gear cluster with the one that I repaired using a new gear http://gardentractortalk.com/forums/topic/62832-repairing-the-15-tooth-gear-on-a-tubeframe-3-gear-cluster . Since I am hoping the only work I will have to do is remove the cluster I decided to work on the transmission in the tractor but did slide it back on the frame tube so I can remove the input shaft, brake drum and shift rails without obstruction. Removed the seat and fender pan and then undid the two side screws that hold the dash support to the front of the transmission cover. I removed the battery and battery tray as I want to apply more tension to the drive belts - as you can see in Picture 3 they are a little loose. Removed the cotter key out of the parking brake lever and then removed the lever from the brake linkage arm - I locked the parking brake in the on position to hold it up out of the way when I slid the cover back and upwards. Undid the taillight wire off the light switch, undid the eight bolts that hold the cover on to the transmission, removed the tool box and then the cover off of the transmission. Positioned an axle stand on each side under the side covers of the frame tubes and set a short piece of 2 x4 on top of each one so that I could use the 2 x 4's as levers to lift up the frame tubes. Blocked the front wheels and removed the two rear tube clamps off of the transmission and loosened the bolts on the front two clamps. With the freewheeling pin disengaged I was able to slowly walk the transmission back on the tubes by prying each side of the tube up a little at a time until the front clamps were at the rear of the tubes. Then I snugged the bolts on them back up - scraped a bit of paint off but that can be touched up later. Then I set a piece of cardboard over the transmission opening and went and cut grass for a few hours. Later I machined three inserts out of round stock that I am planning on sliding into the holes as I remove the shift rails - they are .497" on the O.D. where they will slide in and one has a groove machine in it to let the shifter ball sit in so I can move the other shift rail for the gears as the interlock pin will not let both rods move if the other one is not in the detent groove. I am also going to try and remove the cluster without having to disturb the input shaft seal or the Hi Lo shaft - not sure if it can be done but going to give it a try - have been studying things and I think I have come up with a plan that will work.
 

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Sometimes my plans work out and sometimes they don't - this one was a half and half deal. Removed the snap ring, gear and spacer off of the rear of the input shaft - with the larger holes in the new snap ring I had installed when I put the transmission back together it was a quick and painless operation with the 90 degree snap ring pliers. Had a good look at the 15 tooth gear that I had repaired by welding and grinding and could see the wear pattern was not pretty - it may have ran a long time like that but I think replacing it with the repaired cluster with the new 15 tooth gear is a wise investment. Stuck a rag under the shift rails and removed the roll pins starting with the Hi Lo rail - once the pin landed onto the rag I lifted it out with a magnet. Slid each rail out after I removed the roll pin and as I did so I slid the inserts in to retain the detent balls and springs - used the insert with the groove machined in it on the first reverse shift rail. That part of the plan worked slick as I did not have to fish the balls and springs out or disturb the set screws that plug the holes on the side of the transmission. Cut a short piece of wood and wedged it under the brake drum to support the front end of the input shaft and drove out the roll pin. Since the drum had already been off it just slid off the shaft which made disassembly very easy.
 

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Removed the three retaining bolts for the rear bearing support and bumped the support out by tapping against the inside of the support with a block of wood - since it had a layer of grease put on the o-ring when it was installed it came out fairly easily this time. Then I removed the output shaft and slid the gears off as I did - once the shaft was out I put the gears back in place in order so I would not forget how they were installed. Removing the shaft was fairly simple - just had to rotate it to get it back enough to clear the worm gear and then it slid out. I pushed the rear input shaft bearing back a little bit in the case as it is a loose fit on this transmission and looking at the cluster it looked like it would lift out at the front and clear the case. I removed the input shaft. put a piece of mechanics wire around the front of the cluster and gave it a try but it would not clear - this is where the plan did not work out. Tried for a few minutes and also tried shoving the cluster ahead to see if the rear would clear the rear of the case but it was too tight so I switched to plan B. Took a large flat screwdriver and slid it down from the top and pried the input shaft seal out - it actually came out fairly easy with very little damage and I probably could have reused it but I am not a fan of reusing seals so it will be replaced with the new one I had on hand. With the seal out of the road I removed the front snap ring that was behind it and retains the front input shaft bearing. Once it was removed I could slide the input shaft bearing ahead a bit which allowed the front of the cluster to move ahead and I could then swing the rear of the cluster out of the rear bearing recess and then remove it from the transmission. I had a look to make sure the front and rear thrust washers were still in the bearing recesses which they were. The nice thing about removing the output shaft was that I did not have to disturb the Hi Lo shaft and cluster.
 

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Put a dab of grease in the replacement cluster and set it in place making sure the front and rear thrust washers had remained in place - the front one had but when I slid the cluster ahead to check the rear one it stuck to the cluster and I heard a plop as it went for a dip in the bottom of the transmission. Went and got the strong magnet and did a little fishing - finally found it in the bottom at the front of the worm gear. Cleaned it and the magnet off and stuck the washer to the rear bearing with a bit of grease. Slid the input shaft in from the front through the front bearing, front thrust washer, cluster, rear thrust washer and rear bearing. I checked to make sure the gears all meshed nicely in various gears and ranges and everything looked good so I continued. Put the front snap ring that holds the front bearing in place, greased the inside of the new seal and slid it onto the bulge in the input shaft where it runs - slid the input shaft out about 1/2" so that I could get the seal started on the shaft before I started to install the seal in the housing - with the shaft all the way in the seal fights as it is trying to start into the case and over the shaft at the same time. Once the seal was installed I put the brake drum on the front of the output shaft, lined the hole for the roll pin up with a 1/8" punch, wedged the wood stick I used under the brake drum earlier when I removed it back under the drum again and installed the roll pin (forgot to take a picture). Then I installed the rear spacer, gear and snap ring on the rear of the input shaft.
 

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Discussion Starter · #516 ·
Then I installed the shift rails back in place one at a time and installed the roll pins back in. As I slid the shift rails in I let them push out the inserts as I held onto the insert. I found putting a shop towel under the shift rail made lining up the holes easy to see and made the roll pin less likely of falling into the transmission if I happened to drop it. Once the shift rails were installed I had a good look at where the gears lined up on the cluster in various gears and ranges as the detents positioned them. Things looked good so I loosened the two clamps off and walked the transmission back ahead on the frame tubes. When I got to the driveshaft coupler I slid it over the end of the input shaft and then turned the rear gear on the input shaft until the splines meshed and I could walk the transmission the rest of the way forward until the right side roll pin was up against the end of the right frame tube. Put the two rear clamps back on, covered up the top of the transmission again and called it a day as my back was letting me know how fond it was of the low work bench position. Hope to finish getting it back together in the next day or two so I can take it for a test drive and see if it has more, less or the same amount of noise in Hi Range.
 

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Discussion Starter · #519 ·
You will not have left one screw un-turned!
Nuts and bolts were made to be able to take things apart and after 45 plus years I think most of them were happy they got turned. :D

Got the transmission cover back on, most of the paint on the frame tubes touched up, and the transmission clamps tightened up. Then I installed the fender pan back on and decided to start fabricating a bracket so that I can move the seat back about 2" more so my "little tummy" isn't so close to the steering wheel. To move the seat back any further it had to go up to clear the fender pan at the rear so I made the brackets so they raised the seat up about 2" and did a test fit of the seat. It fits ok and doesn't look too goofy but I may lover the bracket by about 1/2" as I think there is enough room to do this without the seat rubbing on the top of the rear fender.
 

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