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DR. Bolens
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19,152 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After going to an auction in Sept. and picking up a Wisconsin engine for $22 that turned out to be a great runner, I got some inspiration to get my Grandfathers 900 back to life and in operating condition, this one he originally bought in the 80's for $100 at a garage sale!

This one never had a brake drum on the driveshaft so there was usually alot of trouble and aggravation shifting as the driveshaft would not always stop when you depressed the clutch petal, because of this in 2009 I decided to take the engine out and restore my 800 which had the new brake system, that left the 900 without an engine so I ended up breaking it down and storing it in boxes in the garage.

It wont be painted or anything but will just be brought back to operating condition and I'm adding the necessary parts for the brake drum assembly.

Right now its just a bare frame , got the trans seals replaced today , pictures to follow but here's a last pic of when it ran in 2009
 

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Tractorholic
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890 Posts
I have my grandfathers and dads 1050's. They will always be in the family. Great to see you bringing the 900 back to life! Is that the stock 900 seat? It looks like the seat that can never be found on the 1000's???
 

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DR. Bolens
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19,152 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I have my grandfathers and dads 1050's. They will always be in the family. Great to see you bringing the 900 back to life! Is that the stock 900 seat? It looks like the seat that can never be found on the 1000's???
Yep, they had a round seat , the 1000 had a different seat. The 900 and 1000 had unique seats that were never used on any other models
 

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DR. Bolens
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19,152 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Brian was the engine block originally red on these? Mine is brown? Also the steering wheel 3 spokes are they brown or the white cream color?
Engine would have been painted the same color as the frame, the steering wheel is white all around
 

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DR. Bolens
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19,152 Posts
Got it to a rolling chassis today

Replaced the brake pad, and clutch petal bushing and did the rear axle end play today.

Also had the 800 out today to mow so took a picture of that as well
 

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DR. Bolens
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19,152 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
More progress today!

I also found a method of bringing back the faded and dirty throttle housings as well!

Got to thinking today and figured why not soak them in bleach? So degreased them first then dropped them into the sink with straight bleach and went off to cut the throttle cables, after 20 minutes I took some steel wool to them and the dirt came right off with some scrubbing, I let them soak again and more dirt came off, bleach was black when I was done and here's the before and after

Wood Hardwood Fashion accessory Transparency Natural material


Gas Composite material Concrete Event Circle


Got basically everything together on the tractor , Luckily Rick had the necessary parts for me to recreate the brake kit for the drive shaft, including a nice new brake drum Thanks Rick!

So far I have replaced the axle seals, clutch petal bushing, muffler elbow, ignition switch and belts. The goal is to get it operating again and will probably eventually restore it someday, brought back some good memories of when I was a kid being at my grandfathers and mowing with this one.

Saw Motor vehicle Wood Casting Automotive lighting
Tire Wheel Vehicle Motor vehicle Automotive tire
Fixture Motor vehicle Gas Wood Automotive exterior
Motor vehicle Automotive tire Vehicle Automotive exterior Bumper
Automotive fuel system Motor vehicle Gas Camera lens Auto part
 

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Good work! These 900's are nice tractors - I'm in the same positions as you with the brake drum missing, I actually stopped using the tractor because of this. I'm afraid to take the transmission cover off to look at the gears.

Do you have a trick to remove these old rusted exhaust elbows without breaking them?
 

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DR. Bolens
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19,152 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Good work! These 900's are nice tractors - I'm in the same positions as you with the brake drum missing, I actually stopped using the tractor because of this. I'm afraid to take the transmission cover off to look at the gears.

Do you have a trick to remove these old rusted exhaust elbows without breaking them?
Yeah, I dont know how they ever left the factory without brake drums, especially when they used them on the husky 600's already!

The tranny's are usually pretty ugly on the models without the brakes, the gears in mine are basically new as my Grandfather replaced them in the 90's while they were still available through Bolens. Hopefully your previous owner stopped fully before shifting.

Muffler elbows:

Most of the time you can get a pipe wrench on them and do a couple taps with a hammer and they will break free, if not dont press your luck, if its real rusty just cut the elbow right off leaving about 1/2'' sticking out the block, then take a hacksaw blade and cut the remaining bit of pipe just above the threads, take a cold chisel and punch in the pipe where you cut it and it will either break free and you can unthread or if not make another cut and try again

Someone made a good thread with pics on how to do this method.

http://gardentractortalk.com/articles.html/_/tech-tips-how-to/how-to-remove-a-stuck-muffler-nipple-r123
 

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Why remove the elbow unless it's broken?

If you really need to remove it, be very careful because too much pressure can actually break off a chunk of the block. :( :wallbanging:
Ever watch a plumber remove a well pipe that has been down in the water and connected for years? Hold a heavy hard object (I use a 3 lb blacksmith hammer) to one side of the elbow and beat on it with another hammer several times. Go as far around the joint as you can. Don't get carried away with the beating though. Just good solid blows is enough. Most of the time the joint will unscrew. Those threads are not a real close tolerance cut. That is why they made pipe dope for gas and water lines.
 

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Old, but not dead -- yet!
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Ever watch a plumber remove a well pipe that has been down in the water and connected for years? Hold a heavy hard object (I use a 3 lb blacksmith hammer) to one side of the elbow and beat on it with another hammer several times. Go as far around the joint as you can. Don't get carried away with the beating though. Just good solid blows is enough. Most of the time the joint will unscrew. Those threads are not a real close tolerance cut. That is why they made pipe dope for gas and water lines.
All true, except on Wisconsin engines the female threads are part of the block.
 
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