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Tractorholic
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866 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I figured I would post these up for you to look at. Last night I powdercoated a few parts. I used a pebble texture on the dash plate because it was heavily pitted and paint does not hold up as well on the dash. I think this one may go on my son's MF8 and I will take the good plate from his and powdercoat that one in a matte black so the decals can go on it. It does, however, look awesome!





Then I did a couple brackets. I did the indicator bracket in safety orange so the pointer that shows behind the plate is visible. I may paint part of the bracket gray when I do some parts though. Just so it looks better if you look in there. The rod is the hood latch which is in the matte black with the brackets and bolts coated too. Once the dash tower is painted, these will really set it off nice.

 

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Premium Member
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15,923 Posts
The parts turned out great and I like the idea of the indicator being orange. I am iffy on the textured look on the dash panel, it looks great, just don't know if I would like it on the tractor.
 

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Tractorholic
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866 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yea, I hear ya.... that's why it's going on my sons! It was heavily pitted so paint work require filler and normal paint work.
 

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Premium Member
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1,616 Posts
The textured look on the dash looks good. My, MF 1655 has a textured dash that's come from new? like that ,as it's a plastic dash with it molded that way.So really I think it looks good. Now a question for FirefyterEmt. you say powdercoating did you do your own,how do you do something like that.Why I'am asking is there's somethings I wouldn't mind painting that way as well.From what I understand it's a very hard paint once its baked on. Can you give me pointers on how to do this.Larry
 

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Tractorholic
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111 Posts
is this something you did yourself ?

if you clear over the texture it will smooth it out and the decals should go on no problem..

also if you want a smooth finish with rusted and pitted parts try the KL primer -and there would be no need to hide crap with textured/wrinkle powder

that is also a wrinkle powder and not texture -textured feels like sandpaper -wrinkled powder looks like what you have-there is a difference

looks good none the less
 

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Tractorholic
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866 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Larry, for the most part, it is very easy to do. You need clean rust free metal, sandblasting is the best method. From there, it's a rather easy process. You need to attach a ground clip and the powder is kinda "puffed on" with the guy and static electricty. Then it's placed in the oven at about 400 degrees (the powders vary) and once the powder "flows" and looks like a liquid or paint, it is baked for 10 or 15 minutes. Let it cool and bolt it on. If you mess up before it's baked... a blow gun removed all the powder. I like it, but I really need a bigger oven!

PS: "thecoater" Yes, I did it at my home shop. When you mention clear, do yon mean powder coat clear, or wet paint? Wet paint kind of kills the reason I want the plate coated. Is the KL primer a powder product, or a high heat primer? I assume a powder, but let me know more about it. The powder it self was labled "pebble texture" and it's not the typical wrinkle finish which is normally thought of, but I know what you mean.
 

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Tractorholic
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111 Posts
the kl is a high build primer that is powder so is the clear ,not sure of your equipment but multiple coats means you need good tools you may not be able to use it and the clear with your current setup

you also should be doing some sort of pretreatment cleaning process to the substrate before painting or coating

its not as easy as one would think
 

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Tractorholic
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866 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well, ya... That is kind of obvious that the part is cleaned with a pre-cleaner before it's coated... I am just using the Eastwood gun so it's not anything high end, but better than Harbor Freight.
 

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Ron Paul
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1,009 Posts
i dont think hes saying youre coating over grease, but you should apply a phosphate coating or etching. when i have done diy like you i use the eastwood epoxy primer then the base. works great. you can hit it with a hammer and it doesnt chip off. prolly doesnt have the chem resistance of some pro jobs but it costs pretty much nothing.
 

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Tractorholic
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866 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
PS... I did not mean for that to really come off so rude. I only meant that cleaning was something that I did, but I just did not go into details in that post. I am far from an expert in powdercoating and honestly and never used a primer when coating. I am not sure if it would of hidden all the pit's that were in the metal, but I like the idea.

That said, I assume you bake the primer on first, right? Do you need to scuff it down before the top-coat is applied? Can imperfections be sanded out in the primer? Also... is there a good filler that could be used if needed?
 

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Red Tractor Nut & Diesel Addict
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32,409 Posts
I like your powder coated parts. The wrinkly finish looks good too. As with anything, there is a learning curve, and I'm sure you'll pick up a lot as you go. We are not pro's at new things we try, but neither were the pro's when they started. I myself never figure to match a pro at anything I attempt, but I do the best I can, and try to learn to do better as I go. I think you're doing fine FF-emt!
 

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Accumulator
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13,481 Posts
That looks good,great job.
 

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Tractorholic
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111 Posts
I can do just about anything with powder and get the same or better results than with a wet finish -pits, rust corrosion ,blisters I make them disappear all the time,

as far as the primer it is very easily sanded and depending on what kind of finish your going for you can coat and sand and do that until your happy with the results and then add your top coat, or just primer and no sanding depends on the finish you want.
I only use powder-- ,primers, clears ,colors are all done in powder
powder cures at part metal temp for 10-15 minutes not at flow out for 10 -15 minutes powder flows at about 200 degrees part metal temp but wont cure until 400 for a minimum of 10 minutes of PMT you need an IR thermometer

when I said surface pretreatment I mean phosphates(zinc or iron) wash downs and rinses and with aluminum its chromate ,I didnt mean cleaner to remove grease I ment metal pretreatment for the substrate to help seal the surface after its been stripped/blasted-

powder coating can be applied with no primer but thats when your using a phosphate in your wash line- it creates a primer/etch/corrosion resistance for the coating to lay on
otherwise it would be like using a wetpaint and no primer and you wont get the durability out of it you want or may think your going to get

sandblasting is only a VERY small portion of what it takes to get a part ready for powder coating
I wasnt offended at all with what you said ,but to say that its easy and then say your no expert .
I have 8 yrs of fulltime powder coating under my belt and let me say it is not easy ,you skipped atleast 4 steps in your process and probably why it seems easy is all I was saying

Im not saying they dont look good -Im just saying its not as easy as 1 would think if your trying to do it right

for powder go here www.powderbuythepound.com www.columbiacoatings.com www.powder365.com www.nicindustries.com

eastwood's powder is overpriced mismarked crap!

you do quality work isnt that worth doing right the 1st time?
 

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Member
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90 Posts
Nice finish,
I can hardly wait to start on my MF 10
FirefyterEmt said:
I figured I would post these up for you to look at. Last night I powdercoated a few parts. I used a pebble texture on the dash plate because it was heavily pitted and paint does not hold up as well on the dash. I think this one may go on my son's MF8 and I will take the good plate from his and powdercoat that one in a matte black so the decals can go on it. It does, however, look awesome!





Then I did a couple brackets. I did the indicator bracket in safety orange so the pointer that shows behind the plate is visible. I may paint part of the bracket gray when I do some parts though. Just so it looks better if you look in there. The rod is the hood latch which is in the matte black with the brackets and bolts coated too. Once the dash tower is painted, these will really set it off nice.

 

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Member
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90 Posts
Hi,
hopefully I do not offend or ????, but if the above was directed at me, I would have been offended at least 4 times.
This seems to be a pretty good site where people can get a lot of useful information, help with all kinds of problems and display with pride the things they have done-big or small. I myself am very new to garden tractors in general, especially restoring them and really appreciate the help I have already got from others. It is sort of funny, I do not know any of the people here, and will probably never ever get to meet them. But, already, I am getting to know them, from what they do and say.
So hopefully I will contribute in a positive way, like everyone else here, when it is my turn to do so.
thecoater said:
I can do just about anything with powder and get the same or better results than with a wet finish -pits, rust corrosion ,blisters I make them disappear all the time,

as far as the primer it is very easily sanded and depending on what kind of finish your going for you can coat and sand and do that until your happy with the results and then add your top coat, or just primer and no sanding depends on the finish you want.
I only use powder-- ,primers, clears ,colors are all done in powder
powder cures at part metal temp for 10-15 minutes not at flow out for 10 -15 minutes powder flows at about 200 degrees part metal temp but wont cure until 400 for a minimum of 10 minutes of PMT you need an IR thermometer

when I said surface pretreatment I mean phosphates(zinc or iron) wash downs and rinses and with aluminum its chromate ,I didnt mean cleaner to remove grease I ment metal pretreatment for the substrate to help seal the surface after its been stripped/blasted-

powder coating can be applied with no primer but thats when your using a phosphate in your wash line- it creates a primer/etch/corrosion resistance for the coating to lay on
otherwise it would be like using a wetpaint and no primer and you wont get the durability out of it you want or may think your going to get

sandblasting is only a VERY small portion of what it takes to get a part ready for powder coating
I wasnt offended at all with what you said ,but to say that its easy and then say your no expert .
I have 8 yrs of fulltime powder coating under my belt and let me say it is not easy ,you skipped atleast 4 steps in your process and probably why it seems easy is all I was saying

Im not saying they dont look good -Im just saying its not as easy as 1 would think if your trying to do it right

for powder go here www.powderbuythepound.com www.columbiacoatings.com www.powder365.com www.nicindustries.com

eastwood's powder is overpriced mismarked crap!

you do quality work isnt that worth doing right the 1st time?
 

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Accumulator
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13,481 Posts
I like that pebble finish.
 

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Tractorholic
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342 Posts
Hey EMT, good lookin job. I don't care if you drug em two miles down a sandy road, coated em with a flour sifter, and cooked em on the BBQ. I really like that finish. We do what we can do, and submit it for comment, thats how we learn.

Regards, George
 
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