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I'm having a hell of a time removing this pin. Except I'm not, cause it's not budging. Sprayed it down with wd40 and pb blaster, I even tried drilling them a bit thinking it might do something, but nothing. Been banging it with a hammer all morning. Anyone have any ideas with no fancy airtools or anything since i don't have any?
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I even tried drilling them a bit
The only drill bit that will work on a roll pin is a carbide one. All other bits will be destroyed during your attempt. When using a carbide bit on hardened steel normal drilling practice does not apply, use high speed and medium pressure for best results.

One of these bits should serve you well.
 

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There is such a thing as a roll pin punch and it does help keep the thing centered without mushrooming the edges which can make it harder to drive through if its above flush. In your case though.. I actually think you just need to hit it harder. Roll pins that have been in for decades are notoriously difficult to get moving. If you're not using a 3 or 4lb hammer I would consider getting a bigger hammer first. THEN swing harder.
 

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Ingersoll 224, 1989
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A spirol pin is not a roll pin. This is a spirol pin:



Heating will do nothing as the hole expands the spirol pin will expand. A reverse thread easy out would be a tool of first choice. It has to be reverse because you would want it to bite as it is twisted clockwise so as to tighten the roll. That should remove some of the outward pressure. In absence of that special tool, I would try a drill bit just slightly larger than the hole in the center. The idea is not to drill it out, but to grab the inner layer and twist is clockwise.

I think if you use a drift to drive it out you want something the full diameter. Pushing just on the inner rolls could make it tighter on the outer roll.
 

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Well, now I learned that those two different styles of what I would call roll pins have different names. (y)

As far as i can tell though, they make the same sounds while getting their $#@ whooped with a 4lb hand sledge.😇 The biggest problem i run into with pins like that is whether you have room to swing the hammer or not. Also, occasionally you have to hit something hard enough that you worry about bending the piece, or the piece is flimsy/flexible enough that when you strike it it moves, 'soaking' up some of your hammer blow. In those cases i see if i can 'backstop' the piece with another hammer on the opposite side. The idea is the same as a newton's cradle where the balls in the middle (ie your workpiece) don't move.


I also sometimes use another similarly heavy chunk of metal like a body dolly or woodsplitting wedge, etc as the weight for the opposite side based on what will fit. Often times when you are hitting something 'hard' and it's not working it's only because your hammer's force is moving the workpiece instead of moving the pin, and that can be hard to see because the piece might be flexing and bouncing back faster than the eye can see. Adding weight on the other side makes the piece harder to move in the first place, and can make moving the pin 'the path of least resistance' for your hammer force. This is why anvils exist to hammer things on, so we are just taking another hammer or other chunk of metal of similar weight to your striking hammer, and holding it up on the backside as the 'anvil'.

So if you haven't yet hit it hard enough to worry about how to prevent it from bending or cracking off the frame etc, you probably just aren't hitting it hard enough yet. A proper 'pin punch' will definitely help keep the punch centered on the pin while it is still above flush with the hole, but if it is already below flush with the hole, basically any round punch that fits closely to the hole should work.
 

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They do make special punches for driving these out, they have a nub in the middle that keeps them centered in the roll pin. Sometimes you have to drive it one way, then back the other to break them loose. You will probably find wear in the pin that gives it a "shoulder" and that is what is fighting you, along with rust and age. Just dealt with several stubborn roll pins doing the clutch in my model 72, along with installing a creeper drive box. Probably spent a couple hours beating pins out that were froze in place. But they came out with no heat, just PB blaster, and proper punches and a good size hammer with some ass to it.
 
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