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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi! thanks for all the replies! also this tractor is not for competition it is merely for farm work. it is a differential rear wheel drive. also, if it helps the tractor is a Westwood T1200. the tractor will be used for ground works and moving drainage stone in corporation with our Massey Ferguson 30E, so I am just looking for a solution to help move these heavy loads. the tractor is also fitted with a briggs and Stratton 287707 14.5hp engine.

kind regards!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
For weight the easiest thing to do is fill the tires with RV antifreeze.
Using chains on the rear wheels helps a lot with traction in dirt as well as snow. I have chains on my Wheelhorse C160 and have done a lot of landscape dirt moving with a snow dozer blade. I have the rear tires filled, plus 66pounds of weight per rear wheel. Then I added the chains and they made all the difference.
Thanks for the help! Will the antifreeze idea work with tubed tyres?

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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Lawn tractors will pull a surprising load with a 14.5 hp engine, as long as the load is on wheels and there are no slopes involved.

In general, LT transaxles are limited to a maximum static load of 600 - 700 lb, including the operator, but not including the rims and tires and any ballast applied to them.

The lack of weight carried by the rear wheels is the limiting factor for pulling loads with your tractor. The engine is big enough to tow a 7000 lb trailer when installed in a heavier tractor that can carry more ballast.
Yes surprisingly it does have impressive pulling power but if the pulling power was better it would really help!

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Glycol based fluid such as Antifreeze tends to make rubber go a bit soft. I wouldn't use it in tubes.

I had a set of tubed tires on a garden tractor loaded with Antifreeze and they started leaking after a couple of years. Once I got them drained (which took a very long time to do without making a huge mess) I pulled the tubes out and both of them felt like a slimy wet noodle. The antifreeze must have been seeping through the thin rubber, I could not find any holes in the tubes but they were both very slimy and soft.

Alcohol based Windshield washer fluid isn't quite as heavy but it works good in tubes. Windshield washer fluid can be alot cheaper as well. Some of our local auto parts places have the -20F blue stuff on sale for around $2.50 a gallon from time to time.
Thanks for letting me know!
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Well..

What i would do in your position is just have realistic expectations. It sounds like the possibilities for your machine started in the 'low-to-medium' range and might have gone down to 'really low' if it makes a clicking noise and doesn't move. That's not engine or belts.. almost certainly internal to trans. Might have some already partially stripped teeth skipping across each other as the shafts flex apart from each other, etc.

The good thing, things that 'look like a riding mower', most people can't tell the difference between one with a lot of pulling potential and one without, so you can often find a 'good starting point' for pretty cheap because the person who has it might think it's 'just another riding mower'.

So i would keep your eyes out for the next project with better bones for pulling. Anything you learn on the current machine along th
e way will be put to use again in the future, so as long as you're not sinking a crazy amount of time or money, or getting demotivated and giving up, it's all good in the end.
Good idea! I think I will take a look for a quad though due to more speed and power
 
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