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Carbon in the combustion chamber is a normal condition not an indication of wear or damage. If the oil was black then what ever was making it black is still in there and should somehow be removed. Have you checked for a ridge. in the cylinder.
I don't know what you are basing your diagnosed need for a rebuild on. What I would do at this point is look for obvious damage to the cylinder or the valve sealing surfaces. If both those looked good I would pull the engine, remove the pan and clean it thoroughly checking for any debris. With the engine lying on its side you it will be easier to clean the piston top,valves and deck. After removing the carbon you can run the piston up and down wiping the inside of the cylinder between strokes. If all looks good up to this point bolt it back together and check for compression.
You haven't mentioned your access to tools or if you have located a manual so much of my recommendations have been based on the idea that you have these and the inclination to use them.
Don
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Carbon in the combustion chamber is a normal condition not an indication of wear or damage. If the oil was black then what ever was making it black is still in there and should somehow be removed. Have you checked for a ridge. in the cylinder.
I don't know what you are basing your diagnosed need for a rebuild on. What I would do at this point is look for obvious damage to the cylinder or the valve sealing surfaces. If both those looked good I would pull the engine, remove the pan and clean it thoroughly checking for any debris. With the engine lying on its side you it will be easier to clean the piston top,valves and deck. After removing the carbon you can run the piston up and down wiping the inside of the cylinder between strokes. If all looks good up to this point bolt it back together and check for compression.
You haven't mentioned your access to tools or if you have located a manual so much of my recommendations have been based on the idea that you have these and the inclination to use them.
Don
I have not checked for a ridge in the cylinder no. I mostly have hand tools and one drill with bits that's all I have, I don't have any fancy stuff. Needless to say if I don't have the tools I need for the job, my stepdad likely does so I could borrow from him if need be. I do not have an actual owners manual for this tractor sadly, I have one for my 10 horse Craftsman but I have a deck manual

I tried turning the valves today, and they turn both ways if this helps at all
 

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Go here. Tecumseh . From the cross reference in the manuals section I believe the Tecumseh # would be HH60-105030B. I am not real familiar with all the Tecumseh engines but with a little research you may come up with a downloadable manual there. Finding the manual and reading it through will go a long way in helping you to decide what to do next.
Don
 

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I have not checked for a ridge in the cylinder no. I mostly have hand tools and one drill with bits that's all I have, I don't have any fancy stuff. Needless to say if I don't have the tools I need for the job, my stepdad likely does so I could borrow from him if need be. I do not have an actual owners manual for this tractor sadly, I have one for my 10 horse Craftsman but I have a deck manual

I tried turning the valves today, and they turn both ways if this helps at all
The cylinder should be smooth all the way to the top. You can use your fingernail as a "special tool" to see if a ridge is present. :) If it catches as you draw your finger up and out of the cylinder you may want to have someone look at it for boring. The ridge is caused by the wear of the the piston rings against the cylinder. The top of the cylinder does not wear since the rings sit a distance down on the piston, thus the "ridge" is the difference between the worn and unworn areas.
 

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Yep the fingernail test works good. It will detect any ridge, it will also find carbon buildup. The amount of actual ridge is an indication of the amount of wear in the cylinder. If you google Cylinder ridge you will get links to lots of information. How much ridge is acceptable is a widely debated subject.
Don
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Hi folks, I hope everybody had a nice Christmas.

I figured I would post some pictures of what happened with the ATF. Sorry if these are blurry, I took these with my phone and my phone sucks at taking pictures.

Before when I put it in after the PB blaster didn't work.......
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After when I went to check it the next day.....
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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Hello everyone, here are some pictures of when I first took the engine head off along with what the oil looks like when I pulled the dipstick after I noticed there was no more transmission fluid in the spark plug hole. I since sprayed some PB blaster on the carbon and scraped it with one of my flathead/tip screwdrivers and took all the engine mounting bolts out so I can take the engine off at some point, that's all I did for the time being. , that's all I did for the time being. Not sure if these can help decide what is wrong with my engine or not, any help is much appreciated. Thanks!
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The black on the head sealing surfaces looks like the head gasket was leaking. Not a big deal if it didn't hurt the surfaces. Can't tell much from the pictures except it is dirty. I always start by wiping off all the oil and dirt I can. moving the piston and valves up and down and cleaning everything I can reach with a rag and or a paper towel. While doing this I look for signs of damage or wear. I clean the sealing surface of the head and cylinder deck with a razor blade scraper being careful to not scratch or gouge the metal. Then I use the best straight edge I can find to check both for flat. The gasket doesn't appear to be damaged clean it up and inspect it. Many say to never re use a gasket but I have used many multiple times with good results. Look at the cylinder walls for damage/wear. Ideal would be that you can still detect the cross hatching. Not likely but possible. If you don't know what that is just google it I'm sure pictures will come up. Also check the valve sealing surfaces for burn marks and damage. Should have a continues sealing surface all the way around both the valve and seat. Turn the fly wheel until the piston is half way down then rock it back and forth to see if you can detect play. Cleaning is the most important thing at this point. The cleaner you get the more you can see what you have.
Don
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Hi everybody,

I'm back with some updates on the tractor. I cleaned up the head, the top of the piston, and the valves the best I could with a brass brush. Here are some pictures, the first picture is when I was cleaning the head. I sprayed some PB blaster on it and used the brush on it......
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All cleaned up now, is the condition of the head "normal" so to speak in the first picture with those tiny looking crack things?.......
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Here is a picture of the rest of the engine, this is the best I can get it clean unless someone has a tip to make it cleaner than this any help is appreciated. I am thinking of maybe replacing the piston head right now anyway, but there again why fix somethin' that ain't broke and replace something when it doesn't need it so i'm not sure yet. The piston wall is pretty smooth with minor small scratches......
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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
I also have this picture of the engine looking inside the carburetor, I think I see oil there so I think I found my problem of where the ATF and kerosene went.....
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