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A Little Off Plumb
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
On Saturday I picked up a new grass trimmer and chainsaw - both are 48 volt battery powered available from Canadian Tire here in Canada. Usually I am not a big fan of Canadian Tire tools but both items were on sale and had good reviews so I decided to take a chance. The trimmer required a little bit of assembly which took about 15 minutes and the instructions for both units were fairly straight forward. The chainsaw required adding bar oil and greasing the sprocket at the end of the bar and after charging the batteries which took about 2-1/2 hours they were both ready for a test drive. Tried out the trimmer first and was pleasantly surprised by the amount of power it had and very little vibration compared with a gas trimmer I had used once about 20 years ago and swore I would never again as the vibration and noise from it was not impressive. The trimmer has a high and low speed switch and the motor is located at the base which probably helps with keeping the vibration low. Very quiet and used it for about an hour - took several breaks while using it to stop and rest - would estimate got about 35 minutes of continuous run time before it stopped working as the battery was in need of a charge. Stuck the battery back on the charger and tried out the chainsaw on a fallen branch that was about 8" diameter at the large end. Did multiple cuts and got it so I could handle the small limbs and blocked the larger pieces - by then it had gotten very hot so I called it a day. This morning I blocked a 6" branch about 6 feet long that was fresh, hooked up the trailer and loaded it and the limb from yesterday up and then moved to a shady spot. There I finished blocking the branch from yesterday and created a pile as it is fry enough to burn the way it is. After I was done I checked the battery level on the chainsaw battery and it showed it was half charged which I didn't think was too bad considering the amount of cutting I had done. The fallen branch for the most part was dry hardwood - there was a small amount that was doughty where the branch had broke off from the tree - the saw cut through it and the fresh branch pretty much the same as a gas powered saw would have - fyi.

The battery for the trimmer is rated at 2.0 Ah and the one for the chainsaw is rated at 4.0 Ah - nice thing is that they can be used in either tool in a pinch. Thought I would share some pictures and the information in case someone is considering going battery operated - battery operated tools have come a long way since my 6 volt cattery operated 3/8" drill I bought back in 1991. I do have a 110 volt electric chainsaw that I purchased about 15 years ago - woks good but always seem to be tripping on the cord and it comes unplugged easily I find. These new tools should come in handy as they are very low in vibration and much lighter than gas powered equivalents. Both tools have a 5 year warranty on the main parts of the tool and 1 year on the normal wear parts - batteries have a 3 year warranty. So far so good - will see how they stand the test of time as that will be the true test.
 

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Can't say I ever heard of that brand but they do seem nice.
I have some of the 56v Ego brand (chainsaw,hedge trimmer,weed whacker) and think they're great. Hope they do good for you cause I think they'll make life easier for ya..

BTY. For the life of me I don't miss the 2 stroke stuff.
 

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Very nice tools. I think you are going to like them a lot.

I too have a battery powered trimmer and I will not be going back to a gas powered trimmer. For ease of use the battery unit can't be beat. I get tired long before the battery wears out.

I find the battery stays charged even if I don't use it for long periods of time.
 

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Say neat tools Stew. Yardworks seems to be a good tool. I have a 110 volt chainsaw and wood splitter from them. Great working units. Thanks for your info.

Noel.
 

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I went to a battery operated chainsaw and string trimmer about 2 - 3 yrs. ago. It's a Ryobi 40 volt. Best thing I ever did. I was really getting to dislike the fuel mixing. I would guess I have a couple hundred hours on the chainsaw and have been cutting trees up to the size of the bar - 12". It has been great. Just this week ordered a new chain because the old one is so stretched, I'm out of adjustment. The battery operated tools have come a long way. Good luck with yours Stew.
 

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My neighbor went to a Echo battery operated trimmer and chainsaw. He is 82 and could not handle the gas saw anymore. They are 60 volt. He has cut down probably 40 large pine trees since owning it and I even used the saw once on a 9" pine tree. I was pleased with the performance and the ability for the battery to last as long as it does. My BIL just bought a 60 volt Greenworks battery chain saw. He has been in the logging / pallet business since childhood. Again he is my age and fiddling with a heavy and cumbersome gas saw is getting hard for him to handle. Good luck looks like a great combo. Thanks for sharing. Roger
 

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My new line trimmer is a Stihl FS190 I believe is the number. 4 stroke, not 2 stroke. Vibration is basically none existent, Wear hearing aids I always wear the ear muffs so noise is not a problem. Once warmed up a 6" pull and it is running at idle. It does take 50:1 mix but a bottle of oil in a gallon jug and fill with gas keeps fresh gas ready to go. 2 chain saws and 2 line trimmers use 50:1 so mixing is no big deal. I would have to try a battery line trimmer to compare it to this 4 cycle in some of the tall tough stuff I get into so see if they are up to the task. This 4 cycle is a real sipper on fuel too which I was surprised at. A tank of fuel will last a lot longer than this old fart will.
 

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A Little Off Plumb
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
After the cutting jobs I did on Sunday and yesterday I thought it would be a good idea to clean the bar groove and the body of the chainsaw. A bit of accumulation of wood chips and saw dust so glad I did - cleaned out the groove with a flat piece of sheet steel which worked well and then used compressed air to get rid of the remaining wood and sawdust residue. Then I ran the chainsaw with the bar and chain off to see how much oil the oiler puts out - not a lot but should do the job of keeping the bar lubricated. Brought down a 25 foot tree this morning and then trimmed off the branches and blocked the main section of the tree. First thing I did was use the trimmer to remove the long grass and weeds from around the base of the tree. Then picked up the chainsaw and removed a couple of small trees and branches to allow clear access to the base of the tree. The chainsaw worked great and I noticed a couple of things during the operation I thought I would share. The first thing I noticed that while creating the notch and hinge cuts the saw was light enough that I could hold it easily to place then in the correct spots. When I was finishing the cut to create the hinge I could hear the wood cracking as the tree started to lean on the hinge - would not likely have heard that over the noise of a gas unit. Was cautious so waited several seconds as the tree moved a little and then stopped and then I cut a bit more and it finally went over. The other thing I noticed was during the limbing and blocking operation with the gas powered saw I would usually try and cut as much as I could once I started the saw motor before shutting the saw off and this would often result in branches accumulating that could create a tripping situation and the chain would stretch quite a bit as things got warm. With the battery operated saw I would cut a few limbs and set the saw down to clear the work area - this created a safer cutting situation and gave the chain time to cool - same situation when I did the blocking - make a couple of cuts and then clear the blocks and also reposition the tree body so it was not sitting on the ground which made it easier to work on as I cut it up.
 

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Anyone that lays down the $$$$ to buy a battery operated tool or two or three with batteries and charger(s) is going to like it. No choice. Same with buying a car or truck. I am the same way.
 

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A Little Off Plumb
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Anyone that lays down the $$$$ to buy a battery operated tool or two or three with batteries and charger(s) is going to like it. No choice. Same with buying a car or truck. I am the same way.
The same may be said of any new tool (gas or electric accessory or tractor) that you lay out good money for. Not saying the electric versions are any better than gas operated equivalents and they may not be for everyone but after using the trimmer and the chainsaw I am quite happy with their performance and have found what I consider a couple of advantages with the electric units which I have mentioned.
 

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That's quite a battery pack the Yardworks uses. Curious how they will last long term.?
 

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A Little Off Plumb
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I am not sure how the battery packs will stand up in the long run - time will tell. One thing I did check was to see if they got warm or hot to the touch while using the tool for any length of time and also during and just after charging the battery packs. They have remained quite cool to the touch any time I have checked - did leave the trimmer sitting on a couple of saw horses in direct sunlight for about half an hour once and after that the battery pack did feel warm but no warmer than the tool itself.
 
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