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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #81 ·
Tomorrow is the big day ! Tomorrow this cart is coming down off the work table and I'm going to test drive it.

For tonight though, I still have one last part to repair.

This is the tailgate and, as you can see, it needs to be sand blasted and this one corner is rusted up pretty bad.

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It is rusted in between the angle iron frame and the sheet metal in this corner.

After sand blasting, I'm using the saw blade to cut the first two spot welds loose and dig the rust out.

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With the rust cleaned out, I flatten out the sheet metal as best as I can and clamp it down to the table so I can start brazing it back together.

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The brazing is finished on the flat panel and I need to repair the corner of this side edge now.

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I bend up a piece of 1x1/8 inch flat steel.

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This is set into the inside of the corner and welded in place.

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Then the corner area is brazed up. This is how it looks after I sand blast it to remove the brazing flux.

If you look close, you can see flow patterns where I made puddles of the brass and let it flow out to build up the thickness.

This joins the rusted edges of the sheet metal together and brazes them to the angle iron frame and that piece of 1/8 inch thick metal that I put in there.

It also fills in the holes with a layer of brass.

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This is how the area looks after it has been ground down.

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The tailgate is primed and put back in place. The top right corner is the repaired corner.

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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #82 ·
One little tidbit that I realized that I forgot to post. ......

There is a gap between the back of the seat and the front of the trailer bed and you can look down there and see the battery.

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So I made up this little metal piece.

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This fits into that spot.

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So when you look behind the seat the battery is now covered.

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The piece is primed and fastened in place with two flat-head screws.

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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #83 ·
I'm stumped ....

I have completely wired both houses and cars and when I worked for a used car sales back in the late 1960's, I did all of their electrical trouble shooting and repairs.

I'll admit that I am lost when it comes to anything electric on this new stuff that is using computers but I'm not exactly a dummy when it comes to working with electrical systems on the older things like this engine.

This engine ran fine six years ago when I brought it down here but when I tried to start it today it wouldn't go.

As you can see, there is a good hot spark coming out of the coil.

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Using a continuity checker, there is a good connection between the inside and outside of the center coil terminal on the cap.

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There is also a good connection at both of the plug terminals.

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The rotor is working as it should. I sand blasted the center spring and the outside rotor edge and the carbon point in the center of the cap is leaving a good mark on the spring's cleaned surface so I know that the rotor is making a good connection there.

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Yet when I put it all back together, there isn't any spark at the two plug terminals ?

You can see in this photo that the mag drive is spinning over.

I'm sure that whatever is wrong is most likely something very simple but I just haven't been able to figure it out yet.

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I had a cap once with a near microscopic crack. I couldn't see the crack with my naked eye. Occasionally moisture would get in the crack and spark would go to ground and the engine would quit. Take the cap off and spray the inside with WD40, let it air out for a bit then wipe it out with a paper towel and it would be fine till next time.

Don
 

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Mark J.
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Could the plug wires be on the wrong cylinder? You would think it would backfire if they were. Will it fire any with starting fluid? Just a thought.
 

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A Little Off Plumb
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I am wondering if the rotor perhaps has a hairline crack in the bottom where it slides onto the shaft and is passing the spark to ground through the shaft - electricity always takes the shortest path to ground. My experience has been that a crack in the cap will cause a misfire but a crack in the rotor usually creates a no spark situation. Another thing that may also factor in and be adding to the problem is that the new wires may be carbon core creating more resistance before the spark gets to the end of the plug wire than what the system was designed for - carbon core wires usually have around 1000 ohms of resistance per foot. Originally the wires on most magnetos were solid wire creating virtually no resistance between the cap and the spark plug and offering much less impedance for the spark to pass and jump the electrode gap.

Might remove one of the plug wires from the cap and insert your spark tester and see if you have spark with it - if you do then you could do the same with the other wire. If you have spark with the spark tester then it would have to either be the wires or the spark plugs.

Just some observations that may help
 

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tinkerer
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Could the plug wires be on the wrong cylinder? You would think it would backfire if they were. Will it fire any with starting fluid? Just a thought.
I am wondering if the rotor perhaps has a hairline crack in the bottom where it slides onto the shaft and is passing the spark to ground through the shaft - electricity always takes the shortest path to ground. My experience has been that a crack in the cap will cause a misfire but a crack in the rotor usually creates a no spark situation. Another thing that may also factor in and be adding to the problem is that the new wires may be carbon core creating more resistance before the spark gets to the end of the plug wire than what the system was designed for - carbon core wires usually have around 1000 ohms of resistance per foot. Originally the wires on most magnetos were solid wire creating virtually no resistance between the cap and the spark plug and offering much less impedance for the spark to pass and jump the electrode gap.

Might remove one of the plug wires from the cap and insert your spark tester and see if you have spark with it - if you do then you could do the same with the other wire. If you have spark with the spark tester then it would have to either be the wires or the spark plugs.

Just some observations that may help
If you will look closer at the last photo, you will see that I have the spark checker right on the terminal at the cap and the two plug wires are completely disconnected.

Also, all the plug wires are solid wire core, just like the original.

I hadn't thought about maybe having a crack in the rotor .. I'll check that out.
 

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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #88 ·
I think I may have found the problem.

Before I tried to start this, I pulled the distributor cap off and found that the rotor had some carbon build up on it so I cleaned that off and also cleaned the plug terminals on the inside of the cap.

I just took a caliper and measured the distance between the plug terminals inside the cap and divided that in two to get the measurement from the center out to each terminal.

Then I measured from the center of the rotor out to it's edge and I found that there is about .045 inch clearance between the rotor and the plug terminals.

I think there is too much gap now for the spark to jump across.

I was going to solder a small strip of brass onto the outside edge of the rotor but I thought I would see if I could find a new rotor before I did that.

Against all odds, I found a guy that has a tune up kit for this old magneto. It comes with new points, condenser and a new rotor.
 

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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #89 ·
The tune up kit left Seattle, Washington yesterday evening at 9:41 PM. Meanwhile there are other things to work on.

The Viking cart is down off the work table.

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I have a pair of old Ford hubcaps that fit the wire wheels on the Viking. As you can see, they are in sad shape.

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I sand blasted them to remove the rust and the chrome plating. Then I used body fill to fill in the " V-8 ".

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Once that has dried really good, I put them up on the lathe and I have started to rough sand the body fill down using 80 grit sand paper.

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Then they are primed with a lacquer primer.

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Then they get a coat of glazing putty to fill in the small pit holes and sand scratches.

When the glazing putty is dried, it will be sanded down with 150 grit paper and then they will be primed again.

That primer will then be sanded with 250 grit paper and then they will be ready for final painting.

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Quite some time ago I bought a pair of lights off ebay just because I thought they were neat little lights and I might have a use for them sometime. ( I have always had a bad habit of doing that ).

It took awhile to find them and as you can see by the condition of the box, they have been hanging around in my garage for awhile.

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Here are the lights.

With the style of the socket where the wires go into the bottom of them, it tells me that these were made back sometime in the early 1900's to the mid 1920's.

I'm thinking that they probably came off and old fire truck or some other type of emergency vehicle.

Someone had already converted them to 4 inch, 12 volt, sealed beam lights when I bought them.

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Super Moderator
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Cool goodies you have for it!
 

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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #91 ·
I'm working on the lights inside on my train workbench.

Here is one of the lights taken apart and I've already taken out the old wiring.

Notice that there is only the front sealed beam light bulb and no light bulb for the red tail light.

A little light will show from the front light but not much because of the chrome plating on the inside the back of the sealed beam.

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One of these is damaged and I hadn't realized it until now.

If you look close, you can see that the tube at the bottom where the electrical wire goes in, is bent sideways on the light on the right side.

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I had to take them back out to the garage to straighten the damaged one back out.

While I was out there, I went ahead and sand blasted them before I took them back into the house.

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Now .. back to the rear tail light bulb .....

Searching thru my stuff, I found a couple of bulbs, sockets and the springs to fit inside the sockets.

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However there weren't any wires with the sockets but that isn't a problem.

I take the rivet part of a copper Pop-Rivet and solder it onto a piece of wire to form the terminal end.

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I have an assortment of insulators in my train parts and I found two round ones that are just a littler larger then the sockets.

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I clamp them up in the lathe and turn them down to size.

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Then the wire and spring is assembled with the insulator and it fits into the socket.

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I cut out a bracket from a piece of copper.

The socket is then soldered onto this bracket.

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The light socket is then soldered onto the back of the light housing.

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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #92 ·
I wrapped electrical tape a couple of times around the outer edge of the sealed beam and the tail light.

this is to keep the glass insulated from the metal so it will be less likely to chip or crack.

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The lights are put back together and tested.

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The original mounting brackets are re-bent so they can be fastened to the underside of the backrest.

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I'm forming chrome plated copper sink water lines to use as the conduit for the electrical wires to run up along side the mounting brackets for the backrest.

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Once they are both bent to shape, they are sand blasted, primed and painted.

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The lights and the conduit tubes are fastened in place and the electric wires are hooked up.

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Lights on.

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These put out a nice amount of light.

One advantage of having them mounted on the backrest is that they light up the passenger area as well so it is easy to see all of the controls.

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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #93 ·
The tune-up kit arrived today and I'm very impressed with the quality of the items.

It also included a manual with detailed instructions for servicing the complete magneto ( not just the points and condenser ).

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I finished up the hub caps and got them painted.

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They turned out really nice.

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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #94 ·
IT RUNS AGAIN !

Just a short test but I'm pleased with it so far.

The clutch seams to work well.

The wire that I connected to the points to shut the mag off works good too.

I need to do some adjusting on the carburetor.

Both steering brakes need to be adjusted but I really don't want to work on them until I can get it outside where I can drive it around without worrying about running into something.

 

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Mark J.
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Looks like a success!

Thanks for the video!
 
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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #96 ·
OOPS !

It isn't often that one of my projects turns out to not work as well as I had thought they would but that has happened with this one.

The rain stopped so I took it out for a run this morning and the results were really disappointing.

The steering by braking one wheel or the other is very touchy.

The cart wants to pull to one side or the other and I have to keep working the steering levers to keep it going in a straight line.

Also, when I brake one wheel to turn the cart, it seams like the other wheel actually speeds up so that it turns much faster then you would expect.

As a result of this test run, I'm going to re-design the cart by removing the caster wheels and put a regular steering axle in the back that will be controlled by a steering wheel.
 

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Mark J.
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Sorry to hear that. That is a big change. It will be interesting to see how you solve the problem.
 

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I think I would take it out in a wide open space and run it around for a while. Could be an adjustment problem or maybe just a learning curve in driving technique. It was not instant joy for me operating my Bobcat skid steer. The steering was not intuitive and operating the bucket with my feet compounded the problems. Took a little altitude adjustment.

Don
 

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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #99 ·
I think I would take it out in a wide open space and run it around for a while. Could be an adjustment problem or maybe just a learning curve in driving technique. It was not instant joy for me operating my Bobcat skid steer. The steering was not intuitive and operating the bucket with my feet compounded the problems. Took a little altitude adjustment.

Don
I had it out driving around for awhile and my biggest concern is that it doesn't want to keep going in a straight line by itself. I constantly have to keep applying the brake to one side or the other to keep it going in a straight line.

Any little rut or bump makes it jerk to the side and and I have to catch it real quick to straighten it out.

I feel that it would just be too dangerous the way it is to drive around at a tractor show with all the people walking around.
 

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Sorry to hear this, Ray. But I know you'll make a good fix for the issue.
 
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