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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Cold weather is upon us so that means the work on the Servi Cycle is put on hold until it warms up again.
It also means that it is time to work on my trains again. ........

As most of you know, I'm partial to the two extremes of locomotives. The big articulated steam locomotives and the little 4 and 6 wheel switch engines.
The mid range 6 and 8 wheel locomotives were by far the most produced and the most used railroad locomotives and they are also the most locomotives that are re-produced as models .. they just don't interest me that much.

The last few locomotives that I have built have been the smaller ones so I'm going to build a big articulated this time.
I'm thinking maybe a Norfolk and Western, class-A 2-6-6-4 like this.
Train Plant Rolling stock Nature Water



This gives you a good idea of how big these engines were in real life.
Train Wheel Automotive tire Vehicle Motor vehicle



The reason I picked this particular locomotive engine to build is because I just happen to have a brass boiler for one of these. I think it mat be from an old Lobaugh kit from the 1940's or 1950's ?
This is all I have of the kit.
Cylinder Gas Gun accessory Metal Rectangle


Cylinder Gas Tableware Rectangle Auto part


Wood Building Engineering Auto part Gas


Wood Flooring Engineering Metal Hardwood
 

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tinkerer
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Right off the bat I run into a little problem ..
The front of the smoke box on this boiler isn't round like most steam locomotive.
Wood Building Engineering Auto part Gas


I look thru my collection of smoke box fronts and I do not have the one with the special shape to fit this boiler.
There is a company that is re-producing a lot of the brass parts that Lobaugh made back in the 30's and 40's so I look at their on-line catalog.
They have about a dozen smoke box fronts but they do not have one for this particular engine.

Going back thru my parts, I find a one that is the right diameter and the shape of the access door in the center is close to the original.
Watch Gas Watch accessory Auto part Circle


First thing to do is to put it on the lathe and turn down part of the outside diameter so it will fit inside the front of the boiler.
Machine tool Gas Auto part Machine Milling


Then I mill off the flat area along the bottom.
Automotive tire Machine tool Milling Tool Gas


And mill out the notch on the one side.
Milling Machine tool Gas Machine Engineering


This of course leaves edges with no rivets along them.
I have small brass nails with round heads but they are a lot larger diameter than the rivet heads on the smoke box front.
So I turn the head of 6 of the brass nails down to the correct diameter and machine them off flat.
Wood Font Grass Circle Metal


Then I machine the round heads off the rivets on the brass front piece so they are flat like the heads of the brass nails.
The holes are drilled into the front piece and the brass nails are hammered into them.
Gas Metal Fashion accessory Corded phone Jewellery


Here's how the new smoke box front looks on the boiler.
Motor vehicle Cylinder Gas Engineering Machine


Cylinder Gas Engineering Machine Motor vehicle


The front piece is a tight fit on the boiler and as you can see here, it will not fall out on it's own.
Wood Gas Cylinder Engineering Computer keyboard
 

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A Little Off Plumb
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Beautiful work - you must have the patience and wisdom of Job!
 

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tinkerer
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2,417 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
As with the front of this engine, I do not have the correct cab for it either and I haven't been able to find one on line.
These are the parts that I do have though.
Wood Rectangle Material property Metal Plywood



Most cabs on the steam locomotives have a box shape with a straight vertical front like the brass cab shell has.
The front panel on this locomotive is suppose to be angled, not straight up and down.
Train Land vehicle Rolling stock Vehicle Motor vehicle



So I bent the front corners in to make the front of the cab angled. I also bent the front panel to match the angle.
Creative arts Finger Art Wood Metal



these two parts are then soldered together.
Finger Wood Creative arts Metal Fashion accessory



Here's how it looks on the inside.
Art Natural material Wood Musical instrument Fashion accessory



The cab is bolted onto the back of the boiler so I can mark where the front window openings need to be.
Cylinder Gas Ammunition Flooring Gun accessory



The back panel of the cab is attached to it.
Wood Composite material Plastic Automotive lighting Metal



The front window openings are being roughed out on the mill using a 1/16 diameter end mill.
They will be finished to size with a small file.
Kitchen appliance Wood Gas Auto part Machine



Here's how it looks so far, mounted back onto the boiler.
Automotive lighting Train Bumper Wood Fender


Motor vehicle Automotive exterior Wood Composite material Vehicle



The cab will actually sit a little father forward up onto the boiler but I needed to get it all put together so it is a solid piece before I cut the center out of the front panel so it will fit up onto the boiler.
 

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tinkerer
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2,417 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Had a bit of luck yesterday.
I was looking thru ebay last night and came across this brass O-scale tender listed as a buy it now.
This is the exact tender that was used on the N&W 2-6-6-4 locomotive that I'm currently building.
Product Rectangle Font Composite material Electronics accessory
 

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tinkerer
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2,417 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
This is the view in my last post of the cab screwed onto the back of the firebox on the boiler.
If you look close, you can see that the side of the firebox is wider than the cab so I need to narrow the back of the firebox before I can fit the cab up onto it.
Motor vehicle Automotive exterior Wood Composite material Vehicle



I un-soldered and removed the brass backhead piece from the firebox.
I'm going to replace that backhead piece with a Lobaugh factory piece.
The Lobaugh piece is actually for the front of the firebox where it attaches to the boiler but it will work fine for the back piece in this case.

Here you can see the difference in the width between the original backhead piece on the left and the Lobaugh piece on the right.
Wood Natural material Oval Metal Artifact



The new backhead piece is soldered onto the back of the firebox.
I had removed the firebox from the boiler to make it easier to work with.

This back end of the firebox will be visible in the cab. I have ordered a cast brass backhead piece from Precision Scale Company that has the firebox doors and all the gauges cast into it.
This will fit over this end and hide the hole that is in it.
Bell Fawn Toy Working animal Wood



With the back of the firebox now narrower, I marked the area that needs to be cut out on the front of the cab and I'm rough cutting out the opening on the mill.
Machine tool Gas Machine Kitchen appliance Engineering



The opening is ground out to finish size with a Dremel grinder.
Wood Gold Jewellery Folk instrument Tints and shades



The cab is fastened back onto the back of the firebox.
Gun accessory Gas Cylinder Machine Metal


Toy Wood Airplane Machine Aviation


Wood Gas Flooring Bumper Cylinder


Wood Gas Cylinder Machine Metal
 

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tinkerer
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2,417 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have a matching set of drive wheels for this locomotive. One axle is missing but there won't be any problem replacing that.
Wheel Automotive tire Alloy wheel Rim Button



Dumped out my box of locomotive frames to see what I can use.
Wood Air gun Shotgun Ammunition Tool



These are the only two frames that match in shape so I'm going to use them.
I also have a matched set of transmission drives that are designed so both the front and rear set of drive wheels can be powered.
This is the way store bought articulated steam engines are powered.

All of my articulated engines only have the rear set of drive wheels powered. This drive system works alright because the weight of the engine is all over the rear set of drive wheels.
The front set are free wheeling and just get pushed around the layout so they look like they are working also.
Wood Auto part Metal Hardwood Plywood



I also have two pairs of matching side rods for 6-wheel chassis.
There is a problem with these though. The distance between the center holes and the holes on the right side is 1.540, which is a good spacing for the size wheels that I have.

However, the distance between the center holes and the holes on the left is 2.000 ( .420 longer than the rear spacing ).
The wheel spacing between the drive wheels on Articulated locomotives are all the same so I need to shorten the left side on these rods.
Musical instrument Wind instrument Tool Metal Wood



I cut the left end off each of the rods and machined half the thickness off the top of the straight part of the rod ends.
I need to machine half the thickness off the underside of the other part of each rod so the two pieces can be soldered together.

The paper shows my calculations for determining the length to be machined off the underside of each rod ( the area marked F ).
Handwriting Font Rectangle Paper Parallel



the rods are screwed to a block of wood to hold them in place for machining the underside.
Wood Milling Machine tool Drilling Gear



Then they are bolted together as a pair to solder the overlapping joints. This is the best way to make sure that all the holes end up the same distance apart.
Wood Gas Hand tool Cylinder Tool



Here are the finished side rods.
Gas Font Metal Auto part Wood
 

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tinkerer
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2,417 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The drive wheels that I'm using have Lobaugh axle bushings.
Wheel Automotive tire Alloy wheel Rim Button



Here I'm machining slots into the sides of the side frame rail for the axle bushings to fit into.
Wood Milling Machine tool Gas Saw



Checking the fit of the three axles in the chassis.
Body jewelry Wood Finger Musical instrument Jewellery



And seeing how it will work on the curves on my layout.
Composite material Art Symmetry Beige Pattern



These axle bushings have two grooves machined into them that a special horseshoe clip fits into. ( an original bushing and clip is on the table )
The Lobaugh chassis side frames were made out of strap steel with slots cut into them for the bushings to slide into.
The horseshoe clip fits over the side frame and fits into the grooves on the bushings to keep the bushings from sliding sideways and slipping out of the side frame.

I have cut the horseshoe clips in two and fastened one side of the clips to the outside of the brass side frame.
These hold the bushings in place so they can't slide sideways and slip out of the side frame.
Rectangle Wood Bullet Metal Gun accessory



Here is the underside of the rear chassis with the wheels assembled on it. You can see the ends of the clips holding the bushings in place.
Automotive tire Sports equipment Tire Wheel Bicycle part



A piece of flat brass strip is machined out to fasten onto the bottom of the chassis to hold the wheels in place.
Tire Vehicle Automotive tire Automotive lighting Wheel



The finished chassis so far.
Gas Auto part Automotive wheel system Fashion accessory Metal


Wheel Vehicle Motor vehicle Automotive tire Gas
 

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tinkerer
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2,417 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The explanation on this one is going to be a little complicated ..................

A lot of the original style of parts are not available as individual pieces for this particular Norfolk and Western locomotive so I'm having to modify parts from other types of steam locomotives in an effort to keep it as original looking as I can. As I did with earlier with the cab.

I have a pair of steam cylinders that are the same style but were used on two different types of engines.
The shaft that goes into the center of the steam cylinders that the side rod is attached to for driving the wheels is called a ' crosshead ' .
These two steam cylinders are designed to use a crosshead that has just a single upper guide rail support for the crosshead.
On the lower cylinder, you can see a square boss sticking out above the hole in the back of cylinder cover where the single guide rail would attach.

This N&W locomotive had two guide rail supports, one on top and one on the bottom of the crosshead slide.
I have a matched set of four crossheads with two guide rails that I'm going to use on these two steam cylinders.
Artifact Wood Metal Key Fashion accessory



The mounting boss on the back of the cylinders have to be machined off so I can mount the other guide rails to them.
Wood Gas Engineering Machine Metal



The right cylinder in the photo is the rear cylinder for another articulated locomotive and the two steam tubes going into the top of it are very similar to what is on the N&W articulated engine.

The left cylinder in the photo is for a regular engine with a fixed steam cylinder and it has the saddle that the boiler sits on and the two steam tubes that go directly up into the boiler.
Toy Auto part Metal Engineering Motor vehicle



The front steam cylinder on an articulated needs to be able to move from side to side as the locomotive goes around curves so the boiler saddle and the two steam tubes are removed from it.
Engineering Metal Gas Auto part Fashion accessory



The crosshead guides are attached to the back of the cylinders.
Combat vehicle Gun accessory Metal Ammunition Machine


These two steam cylinders are just a little too narrow to use as is.
With the cylinder sitting in place on the chassis, you can see that the hex head screw for mounting the side rod onto the wheel is hanging out over the lower guide rail. Obviously, this wheel can't rotate because of this.
Motor vehicle Machine Auto part Toy Metal



So the steam cylinder is cut in half and widened out a little. A piece of 1/8 thick brass plate is soldered onto the bottom so that I can drill and tap it later for mounting screws to fasten into it.
Toy Auto part Metal Toy vehicle Event



Then a thin strip of brass if formed to fit around the rest of the center area of the steam cylinder and soldered in place.
Wood Natural material Metal Fashion accessory Bronze


Toy Motor vehicle Wood Car Toy vehicle



Now you can see that there is clearance between the heads of the mounting screws for the side rods and the inside of the crossheads and their guide rails.
Sculpture Gas Vehicle Machine Metal
 

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tinkerer
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2,417 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
The rear drive assembly is mounted onto the boiler.
Vehicle Gas Wheel Cylinder Automotive exhaust



Now I need to make the part of the frame that will extend back to the end of the cab.
Wood Metal Toy vehicle Auto part Musical instrument



I have an old locomotive frame that isn't in very good condition so I'm going to use parts of it to extend the frame back and also to extend the front drive assemble forward.
Wood Tool Artifact Antique tool Metal



The tail section of the frame is cut off and machined to fit onto the back of the drive assembly.
Wood Nickel Metal Fashion accessory Titanium



A square piece of 1/8 thick brass is fastened to the inside of the back of the cab with two 2-56 screws.
The drive assembly is set back in place and the back end of frame is soldered to that square brass of piece.
A piece of tin-foil was put in between the back of the cab and the square brass piece so the solder wouldn't go all the way thru and stick everything to the inside of the back of the cab.
Rectangle Auto part Fashion accessory Metal Electric blue



Turning the locomotive over on it's wheel, you can see the back part of the frame sticking out underneath the bottom of the firebox.
Wheel Vehicle Tire Gas Motor vehicle



I have a lot of this 9/16 inch wide " rivet strip " and I'm going to use some of it to extend the lower part of the firebox.
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I cut pieces out of the rivet strip and formed them to fit the shape of the bottom of the firebox.
Road surface Asphalt Metal Cylinder Auto part



This is then soldered onto the bottom of the firebox to extend it down even with the frame.
Cylinder Wheel Motor vehicle Gas Automotive tire



The smaller piece fits around the front corner of the firebox.
Wheel Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive lighting Vehicle



Whoever had built this boiler assembly, had gotten the height of the bottom of the firebox wrong so that one side was almost .100 lower than the other side.
By putting these two lower extensions on, I was able to make both lower edges of the firebox so they are now even with each other.
 

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What radius curve are you planning on running this engine one? All the articulated HO scale engines and 6 driver G scale I have seen had the center drive wheels floating so they would negotiate the curves. Or they had the wheel flanges removed. If they are not allowed to move side to side they will derail unless on very wide radius curves. Just curious & may be different on the O scale units.
 

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tinkerer
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2,417 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
What radius curve are you planning on running this engine one? All the articulated HO scale engines and 6 driver G scale I have seen had the center drive wheels floating so they would negotiate the curves. Or they had the wheel flanges removed. If they are not allowed to move side to side they will derail unless on very wide radius curves. Just curious & may be different on the O scale units.
The curves on my layout are 54 inch to the center of the track.
The axle with the gear drive can't move side to side but the other two axles can move a total of about 1/8 inch from side to side.

With this combination of large radius curves and two floating axles, the 6 - 6 wheel arrangement locomotives run alright on my layout.
I have two locomotives with 8 - 8 wheel arrangement and they won't run on this layout.
I would need to have larger radius curves or cut the flanges off the two sets of inside wheels for them to run.
 

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tinkerer
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2,417 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I'm using an electric can motor to power this engine.
I have already machined a piece of round brass for the coupling between the motor and the transmission. It is tightened onto the shafts with set screws.

A piece of wood is being used as a spacer to line the motor up.
I have drilled the two mounting holes in the flat piece of brass that will fasten onto the back of the motor for the rear mounting bracket.
Gas Cylinder Metal Gun accessory Auto part



The rear mounting bracket is bent at 90 degrees and it is fastened onto the back of the motor.
The rear of the frame has been machined flat for the mounting bracket to set on.
There is a small square block mounted forward on the frame to support the front of the motor.
Wood Auto part Tool Metal Nickel



The motor is fastened in place.
Toy Gas Cylinder Auto part Metal



With the frame set back onto the bottom of the boiler, you can see that the electric motor fits up inside the open space in the firebox.
Rectangle Gun accessory Bullet Fashion accessory Metal
 

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tinkerer
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2,417 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The rear truck is mounted to the underside of the chassis with a shoulder screw that allows it to move up and down a little and pivot from the front of the truck.
Motor vehicle Automotive tire Musical instrument Vehicle Toy



When the chassis is picked up, the truck falls away from the frame with just the front mounting screw and there is a risk of braking the front mounting tab off the truck.
So I need to make a rear mount that will hold the truck in place and still allow it to pivot and move up and down a little.
Tool Trigger Musical instrument Gun accessory Wood



I start by making a steel strip that will fasten to the back of the truck.
Automotive exterior Auto part Fashion accessory Metal Bumper



With the strip in place, it leaves a slot along the back of the truck.
Auto part Bicycle part Tool Fashion accessory Thumb



Next I bend another strip of steel and fasten it to the underside of the frame.
The location of where the slot will be lined up is marked with a piece of masking tape.
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The steel strip is bent over at this point.
Gas Auto part Metal Wood Machine



This fits into the slot on the back of the truck.
Wood Musical instrument Gas Gun accessory Bullet



With the chassis sitting on the track, you can see that the steel strip fits into the slot with room for the truck to move up and down and side to side.
Train Wheel Automotive tire Track Rolling



When the chassis is picked up now, the rear truck is contained and can't fall away from it like it use to.
Bumper Trigger Wheel Motor vehicle Wood



Checking the movement of the rear truck on the curve.
Train Motor vehicle Rolling stock Automotive tire Track
 

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tinkerer
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2,417 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
A piece of brass rod is soldered onto the rear of the front drive chassis and a shoulder screw is made up to fasten the front and rear chassis's together.
Wheel Motor vehicle Machine Combat vehicle Metal



Here they are hooked together.
Toy Yellow Auto part Metal Gas



Because the two drive chassis's are able to pivot, this will allow this long engine to be able to go around curves.
Building Vehicle Automotive tire Amber Automotive wheel system



These are the parts that will make up the driveshaft between the front and rear drive gearboxes.
Tool Household hardware Wood Screw Cylinder



A piece of brass rod is machined out so the piece with the ball end can fit into it.
Household hardware Cylinder Auto part Metal Wood



This is fastened onto the shaft of the front gearbox.
Wheel Auto part Toy Metal Event



Then the front drive is attached to the rear drive chassis with the driveshaft connecting the two gearboxes.
Motor vehicle Musical instrument Auto part Fashion accessory Metal



Here you can see how the front drive chassis is still able to pivot with the ball end fitting into the driveshaft end with the slots in it.
The driveshaft is rotated between the two photos to show how the pins in the ball end slide along the slots as the driveshaft rotates.

By using a ball and slot type of universal joint, it allows the two chassis's to be separated easily.
Motor vehicle Vehicle Automotive wheel system Metal Auto part


Vehicle Auto part Automotive wheel system Fashion accessory Metal



The driveshaft and gearboxes work smoothly but I have ran into a snag ........ the front gearbox rotates twice as fast as the rear gearbox.

These are both old PSC gearboxes and they came in two gear ratios.
The rear gearbox id the 25 to 1 gearing and the front gearbox is the 12.5 to 1 gearing.

Unfortunately, these gearboxes are no longer shown in their on-line catalog so I'm going to have to call them on Monday to see if they are still available.
If they are .. all I have to do is buy another front gearbox to match the gearing that I already have in the rear gearbox.

...................................................

I got to thinking about this and remembered that I have another PSC gearbox with the high input shaft like the one on the rear drive chassis.

I took it apart and it has the gear ratio that matches the gearbox on the front drive chassis.
So all I have to do is switch the gears out of this housing and put them into the housing on the rear chassis.

The reason I'll switch gears instead of just changing the whole housing is because I have already modified the other housing to fit the frame.
Toy Wood Bullet Auto part Gun accessory
 

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A Little Off Plumb
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The fun you can have building a locomotive and your thought process that solves the problem is very interesting to watch. If the motor used DC it might be possible to use a Pulse Width Modulation set up to turn the motor on and off to reduce the speed so it matched the other motor but your method is much simpler.
 

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tinkerer
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2,417 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
The fun you can have building a locomotive and your thought process that solves the problem is very interesting to watch. If the motor used DC it might be possible to use a Pulse Width Modulation set up to turn the motor on and off to reduce the speed so it matched the other motor but your method is much simpler.
The motor is DC current and it drives both gearboxes.
 

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A Little Off Plumb
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The motor is DC current and it drives both gearboxes.
Sorry - I had an old timers moment and for some reason thought there were two separate motors - changing the gears is the only way then.
 
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