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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You can add an electric starter to that engine. Main challenge will be finding a flywheel that will work. I expect the vertical shaft version (common on older Snapper riders) uses the same flywheel. That old Briggs is probably superior to a Predator.
It is not the original Kohler motor on the tractor, it is a Briggs 195432-4035-01. Based on the parts manual I found for it there is no option for an electric start that I can find. I don't want to modify this motor, I would rather look at repowering with something modern that would allow for battery push start, maybe a circuit for headlights.
I am going to use it for the next couple weeks bringing in wood with a cart and see what I think. I can not find an assembly diagram of the mower deck, if anyone has one or a picture of a mounted mower deck I would greatly appreciate it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So it's running [and mobile]!
I'm going to change the oil this weekend and use it haul a trailer and stock up the wood pile by the house.
Did a little digging on the motor [Briggs 195432-4035-01] and it looks like it is possible to add an electric start. Would like to add a battery so I can do a key start but haven't gotten too deeply into it. Going to pull the motor next week or so and tear it down to see what sort of shape it's in. Certainly need to do something about the muffler as it is a motor mounted unit that is directly above [almost touching] the gas line to the carb.
I think I figured out how the mower deck goes together so I'll mess with that this weekend as well if time allows.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I removed the motor to tear it down and service it. It seems like a sound motor after searching up info on it so I am going to get it cleaned up and reinstalled for next year. I thought about going down the battery start rabbit hole but have decided that will be a project for another day. But, while disassembling the pull starter I found a rope start ring underneath.
Ordered a few parts so will continue the tear down over the next few days.
Noticed that it has a low fuel light, not sure how it works so going to look in to that, mostly not sure how/if its powered.
Cleaning out all the grime and mek on it will take some time. Not sure if it was originally red or if someone just sprayed it at some point.

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60' Wheel Horse,66' Wheel Horse, 70' Wheel Horse, 71' Wheel Horse, 71' Wizard
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Found this on the web Briggs & Stratton 195432-4035-01 - Briggs & Stratton Horizontal Engine Alternator Chart, Elect Starter Parts Lookup with Diagrams | PartsTree , It is an electric start for your engine, some of the parts are listed as "unavailable" but at least it has some part numbers for them that gets you in the ballpark to do some searching for them. If that briggs is a 7 H.P. I/C engine , that is the same engine I have on my Troy Bilt horse tiller (might be where that engine came from since it is red) I know that there is an electric start option for that engine for my tiller .... Wish mine came with it at times , hope this can help you some.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Found this on the web Briggs & Stratton 195432-4035-01 - Briggs & Stratton Horizontal Engine Alternator Chart, Elect Starter Parts Lookup with Diagrams | PartsTree , It is an electric start for your engine, some of the parts are listed as "unavailable" but at least it has some part numbers for them that gets you in the ballpark to do some searching for them. If that briggs is a 7 H.P. I/C engine , that is the same engine I have on my Troy Bilt horse tiller (might be where that engine came from since it is red) I know that there is an electric start option for that engine for my tiller .... Wish mine came with it at times , hope this can help you some.
Thanks, I appreciate it very much. How do you like the motor on the tiller, enough juice to do the job? In the manual I found for the motor it shows displacement at 19.44 cu. in. - 318.5 cc, not sure how that translates to HP.
In any case I'm going to tear it all the way down and then rebuild. It's actually not in that bad of shape, just very very dirty and grimy. I have some parts on the way which will motivate me to get the job done so I can fire it up while it's warm enough to do so.
 

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60' Wheel Horse,66' Wheel Horse, 70' Wheel Horse, 71' Wheel Horse, 71' Wizard
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I love that engine on my tiller ! I bought it brand new I think in 1994 straight from Troy Bilt when those tillers were built very well, now that MTD owns them they are not what they use to be. Yes the engine has the power to do the job and is still doing her job 28 years later . The engine you have like mine is an "I/C" engine meaning "Industrial / Commercial" and the bonus is it has a Cast Iron cylinder sleeve which makes it a little more durable which is what sold me on that model of horse tiller in 1994.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I love that engine on my tiller ! I bought it brand new I think in 1994 straight from Troy Bilt when those tillers were built very well, now that MTD owns them they are not what they use to be. Yes the engine has the power to do the job and is still doing her job 28 years later . The engine you have like mine is an "I/C" engine meaning "Industrial / Commercial" and the bonus is it has a Cast Iron cylinder sleeve which makes it a little more durable which is what sold me on that model of horse tiller in 1994.
Thanks again. So the engine is an early 90s production. Glad to hear it's a solid unit, I was on the fence with rebuilding it but reading your post makes me feel even more optimistic. To be honest once I pulled off the recoil starter and saw the ring for a rope starter installed behind it I was pretty much sold. I love bringing old iron back to life [sometimes the more lost the cause the more I am motivated to fix it]. I also love having a project so I have an excuse to be in the workshop tinkering around and drinking beer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I removed the screen cover and the recoil starter is like no other that I have encountered before. Here’s a couple pix:

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Question:
Do I need to remove the recoil starter part before pulling the flywheel? If so, how do I do that?
Or
Do I put a flywheel puller on the flywheel and pull everything off with the flywheel?
I haven’t done any research yet so I am sort of being lazy, but any input is appreciated.
 

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That is the "classic" Briggs starter clutch. Here's a couple tips of how I work with them:

Briggs and Stratton sells a special tool to remove and install the clutch, since it doubles as the flywheel nut. However, here's what I do. First I dissassemble the clutch. Then I just take a socket extension and a hammer and place the big end of the extension on one of the parts that stick out around the edge of the clutch. Then I whack the extension with the hammer to loosen or tighten the nut. Kinda hard to describe. I reinstall the clutch casting to secure the flywheel before I assemble the clutch.

When reassembling the clutch, make sure you put plenty of oil on the skinny part at the front of the crankshaft or the clutch will squeal.

There should be six balls in the clutch. It's easier to put them back in if you lean the engine back.

After the clutch is removed I just whack the back of the flywheel with a hammer to remove. Works for me. Just don't whack the magnets.

By the way, why rebuild the engine? Does it burn oil?
 

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Yeah that's the same starter clutch set up I have on my tiller's engine , I'm pretty sure after 28 years it is in need of replacement along with the rest of the assembly , most of the times when I want to start it, the rope recoil starter just pulls out without turning over the engine , I have to take my fist and "Rap" on the front of the recoil starter to get it to engage, that's why I wish in '94 I would of spent the extra money and got the electric start option added, LOL !! Thanks for the info. on removal Frank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
That is the "classic" Briggs starter clutch. Here's a couple tips of how I work with them:

Briggs and Stratton sells a special tool to remove and install the clutch, since it doubles as the flywheel nut. However, here's what I do. First I dissassemble the clutch. Then I just take a socket extension and a hammer and place the big end of the extension on one of the parts that stick out around the edge of the clutch. Then I whack the extension with the hammer to loosen or tighten the nut. Kinda hard to describe. I reinstall the clutch casting to secure the flywheel before I assemble the clutch.

When reassembling the clutch, make sure you put plenty of oil on the skinny part at the front of the crankshaft or the clutch will squeal.

There should be six balls in the clutch. It's easier to put them back in if you lean the engine back.

After the clutch is removed I just whack the back of the flywheel with a hammer to remove. Works for me. Just don't whack the magnets.

By the way, why rebuild the engine? Does it burn oil?
Thanks for the insight Frankill, very much appreciated.

As far as why rebuild the engine, well there are a number of reasons:
  1. It is/was very dirty, caked in fact, it ran but with that sort of obvious abuse all parts are suspect until proven otherwise. Maybe it was rigged up so that it ran for a quick sale? [though I don't suspect that]. I prefer to give all equipment a very thorough going over post purchase. By tearing it down completely I can identify any questionable items.
  2. I am putting into regular service when it is complete [hauling/mowing] I want it to be 100% perfect before doing so. That way if something breaks, I know I broke it and can diagnose the issue from the start. [see inherited issues above]
  3. In for a penny, in for a pound. I needed to remove the engine to service the tractor body and clean it up. Being that it was off the machine and on the workbench it is easy to work on. I don't need it "right now" so there is also time to do so. If you're investing 2 hours, why not make it 10 and completely take it apart and rebuild? To me it just makes sense. I will also be able to familiarize myself with the motor so when [not if] it has issues in the field I will know what to look for from the start.
  4. I am just that type of person, I could show you before and after pix of a number of projects. I can't really explain, it's just hardwired. I like being in the workshop doing small projects. It allows my brain to shut everything out and focus on problem solving [sort of like people who do puzzles or make models] in the end I have a nice working machine.
  5. And finally a quote from George Mallory, "Because it was there."
 
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