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Tractorholic
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well,

I picked the Steiner up last week, and am just getting around to getting some pictures posted.

We put the axle selectors midway between high and low range, and it rolled like a champ, even with severely underinflated tires!! I used my two-bit HF portable electric winch to get it up on the trailer... worked with out a hitch.


The date on the oil filter is 2009, so it's been sitting a while. It is missing a few parts--the double groove idler pulley for the PTO, the left hand door, and one of the wheel mounts for the dual wheel setup-- I found a double groove finished bore pulley of the right size (4.75") at Surplus Center--I'll put a sealed bearing in it with a 1/2" bore, and I"ll be good to go. I'll fabricate the other parts, though I probably won't run dual wheels on it unless I actually need them.

I worked on it on the trailer at first since it's easier when the tractor is up off the ground a bit. I couldn't get it to start, or even turn over at first. So, since carburetors are almost full of crud--especially for a vehicle sitting this long, I started there first.

I was worried I'd need another carburetor and wasn't sure I could find one easily. I had a Carter carb off a K241 from a Cub 102, so I cleaned it off a little, removed the Keihin and compared the two.

Motor vehicle Hood Vehicle Auto part Electrical wiring


Cylinder Gas Machine Cookware and bakeware Metal
Gas Nut Machine Metal Auto part


I had planned to use a carb from a Kohler, etc. if I needed to replace it, but I was surprised to see that the Carter carburetor (on left) has a larger opening, and wider span between mounting holes, even though it's designed for a 350cc engine.

My second big surprise came when I opened up the carburetor, and didn't find any deposits in the float bowl or varnish.

Hood Automotive tire Motor vehicle Vehicle Automotive design

The wiring was the usual collection of splices, poor crimps, etc. The machine has a master switch that senses the position of the PTO lever, makes sure you're sitting in your seat, neutral gear position, etc.

I couldn't use much of the wiring as it's in the underside of the machine, and very hard to get at, not to mention all the backyard electrical work done on it.

I put a little oil down each cylinder, and turned the engine over by hand to make sure there was some lube on the upper cylinder walls.

I finally jumped the coil and starter solenoid and squirted a little carb cleaner in the intake of the carb, and the engine roared to life.

I didn't run long, because the item that really needed cleaning was the tank:

Eye Fluid Automotive tire Cuisine Asphalt

So, I finally offloaded it from my trailer and pushed it into my garage:

Tire Wheel Vehicle Automotive tire Motor vehicle


I drained the tank as much as I could, and poured a couple gallons of white vinegar into the tank and let it sit overnight. I tried scraping the gunk and rust the next day and it came right up--problem is how to get to the entire tank since it's a main component of the frame.

I finally hit on putting a piece of 5/8" ID heater hose into the fill hole, and slide it in and out--it moves along the floor of the tank and knocked a bunch of crud loose, where it floated to the top. The hose also picked up a bunch of rust and crud, so I cleaned it off every time I pulled it out of the tank.

I'm going to make an air vacuum to suck the crud out of the tank--hopefully it will get the lion's share of it. I have more vinegar to use for flushing the tank-- so I think i"ll get most of it.

The Steiner's have a 2" metal pipe nipple coming down from the tank on the left side... it's called a sump in the operator's manual. It has the tank valve mounted about half way up it. The sump is used to collect the crud and rust in the tank.

Problem is, I haven't been able to get the cap off the end of the nipple. I can't apply a torch for obvious reasons, so I just keep applying liberal amounts of PB Blaster and hope I can get it to come free and unscrew.

I finally gave up on getting the existing wiring to work and ran a separate line to the starter solenoid and the coil. I use a small snowblower fuel tank to test engine with, so I clamped it to the cab and ran a line down to the carb. Even though I didn't have any new gaskets when I put the carb together, none of it leaks. After that it started right up.

The battery isn't charging, so I'll need to address that soon, plus get the fuel tank clean and usable.

Enjoy the pictures, I'll post more later.

Smitty

 

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Tractorholic
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Pretty neat machine ! Is there any way you can get to the pick-up tube in the tank to put a suction strainer/screen on it ? I had to do that to a Hyster at work , it only had a 3/8" steel line coming from the top , I cleaned the tank the best I could but like yours it part of the machine .
 

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If you can get at both side of that pipe cap, hold a heavy hammer or what ever you have that is heavy and solid on one side and hit it with a hammer on the opposite side. Work your way around the cap right at the joint. Seen this done by plumbers on well pump pipe many times and worked for them. I have done this on exhaust coupling too with success. Good luck.

Wild looking machine you latched on to. Lot of work ahead but tons of fun when your done, if we ever get done with projects like that.
 
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Tractorholic
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Pretty neat machine ! Is there any way you can get to the pick-up tube in the tank to put a suction strainer/screen on it ? I had to do that to a Hyster at work , it only had a 3/8" steel line coming from the top , I cleaned the tank the best I could but like yours it part of the machine .
No, unfortunately. The fill spout is in the center of the tank, and the sump is on the left hand side...

Smitty
 

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Tractorholic
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Can you put a pot of hot water around the pipe cap? Even a 100* raise in temp may loosen it for you. Good Luck, Rick
Thanks, Rick... I thought of doing something like that... it may do the trick... I've also had several people in the past tell me that gasoline and ATF are good for freeing up rusted bolts, etc.

Also, one of the old hand mechanics where I used to work would use brake fluid to free up pistons stuck in the cylinders of an engine...

Smitty
 

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Tractorholic
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If you can get at both side of that pipe cap, hold a heavy hammer or what ever you have that is heavy and solid on one side and hit it with a hammer on the opposite side. Work your way around the cap right at the joint. Seen this done by plumbers on well pump pipe many times and worked for them. I have done this on exhaust coupling too with success. Good luck.

Wild looking machine you latched on to. Lot of work ahead but tons of fun when your done, if we ever get done with projects like that.
LOL!! Yeah, just when I get some of my projects sold off, or rarer still--finished, something like this comes along. I've wanted an articulated tractor for quite some time--now after I buy this one, 2 STeiner 420s come on auction--just the tractors without attachments, though one has a 3 point hitch.

Thanks for the tip with the hammers. I have done the same to loosen tie-rod ends so I didn't damage the seal with a pickle fork, but didn't think of doing it in this case.

Regards,

Smitty
 

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Welcome to the articulators club, seems our little group has recently grown quite a bit. Good luck on the restoration and hope to see more pictures soon. I always likes the Steiners, they seem well built and have a great reputation.
 

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Tractorholic
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Welcome to the articulators club, seems our little group has recently grown quite a bit. Good luck on the restoration and hope to see more pictures soon. I always likes the Steiners, they seem well built and have a great reputation.
Thanks Eric--

Are you familiar with the hydraulic fluid to use in the Steiner? The manual and the machine say to only use Texas Refining Corp Universal Torque Fluid--which I haven't been able to find here in Utah, yet. It's a 10W-20 oil with anti-rust, anti-foaming, etc.

A TRC distributor online says it can be used in lieu of CAT TO-2, John Deere Hy Gard J-20-A, John Deere 303 J-14-C, John Deere J-20-C, IHC Hy Trans B6, and several others.

Smitty
 

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Tractorholic
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
That Steiner is cool! I've always wanted one, but unless one falls from the sky, I'm not gonna get one. Talk about pulling a plow (or 2 or 3)!
This one doesn't have a 3 point hitch, but there is one on auction nearby that has the 3ph... I'm going to try and take a look at it and see if I could fabricate one.

Here's a picture: Wheel Tire Car Automotive tire Automotive lighting


Smitty
 

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I am not sure of the fluid they are talking about. I was a hydraulics specialist in the Navy and I would say that any fluid that is the same viscosity as the fluid mentioned would work. Hydraulic fluid is all anti foaming due to the fact that air is a hyd. systems worst nightmare! Most systems in tractors have air bleeders in them to expel any bubbles that may find their way into the system anyways. I have heard good things about HY GAURD you may want to go with that or similar. To tell you the truth most fluids are manufactured in the same place so don't spend an arm and a leg on expensive fluid as it won't make much difference. Good luck.
 

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Try some Acetone/ATF! I use that all the time on rusted bolts and have had success every time.
 
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Tractorholic
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I am not sure of the fluid they are talking about. I was a hydraulics specialist in the Navy and I would say that any fluid that is the same viscosity as the fluid mentioned would work. Hydraulic fluid is all anti foaming due to the fact that air is a hyd. systems worst nightmare! Most systems in tractors have air bleeders in them to expel any bubbles that may find their way into the system anyways. I have heard good things about HY GAURD you may want to go with that or similar. To tell you the truth most fluids are manufactured in the same place so don't spend an arm and a leg on expensive fluid as it won't make much difference. Good luck.
Thanks, Eric... good information.

Smitty
 

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Tractorholic
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Try some Acetone/ATF! I use that all the time on rusted bolts and have had success every time.
Thanks, Kenny!!

I did get the fitting off using the hammer trick, but I'll store this info away for future reference--in this hobby we're always trying to free rusted bolts!

Smitty
 
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