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Hello all,

Wondering what the most common tools are to repair and maintain or restore a garden tractor are. Specifically, im trying to make some strategic black friday tool purchases. I have a JD 112 to get my feet wet. Wratchet and socket size, screwdriver size, odds and ends, etc.

I dont know why, but I think id like to get some ratcheting wrenches. Are these useful? What about the electric socket drivers they make.

Also, im looking for a new compressor (best value) to support sandblasting, painting, and running air tools. Any recommendations on specs? Will single stage work? How many gallons?

Thanks
 

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A good air compressor is great to have but you'll need a pretty big one to do any kind of sandblasting with it. And honestly air tools are becoming a thing of the past. I have quite a few and use none of them anymore (or rarely). Use all battery tools. But some kind of a air compressor is a must.
 

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Air tools and cordless tools are great to have and very useful. I have a fair amount of tractors but still like turning wrenches by hand. When it comes to sand blasting, A sand blasting cabinet will require about 10CFM at 90psi to operate continuously. A pressurized sand blaster will require about 18 to 20CFM to operate non-stop
 

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For air compressors, avoid oil-less. Oil-less are noisy as all get out. Get as large of tank as you have room for. 220v power is nice if you have it.

Ratcheting wrenches are nice, but get a nice set of traditional combination wrenches first.

Craftsman is not what it used to be. When I wanted some larger Craftsman wrenches I went to eBay for vintage wrenches.

Don't forget a floor jack and a 1/2" torque wrench.
 

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I’ve got a 1/2” Craftsman socket set from the 1970’s. They were the first serious tools I got and they still work perfectly today. My mother worked part time at the Sears order office in the small town where I grew up. She got an employee discount but Craftsman tools were still a serious cost. Got the basics for Christmas when I was 14 I think. I was building a go cart at the time! I recently bought one of those Stanley tool sets with all 3 socket sets, wrenches, Allen keys etc. It came in a nice plastic case and the black finish on the tools looks nice but it is wearing off after only a little use. I bought it so I could just toss it in the car when I may need tools for a job. Convenient, but the quality just isn’t there like the older Craftsman stuff I have. A good vise and a drill press are 2 tools that get a lot of use when working GTs. A piece of 3/4 round secured in a solid vise can make a good starting point to make changing front tires a breeze. I’ve spent an hour in the past chasing a 6”rim around the garage floor trying to pry a tire on or off. Using the vise it only took me a few minutes to change out a 16x6.5/8 tire the other day. An air compressor is a necessity. I have a small but heavy quiet compressor about 2.5cfm at 90 psi. Works great for all my woodworking trim nailers and also inflating tires etc. Quiet is good in my books. Floor Jack, jack stands, car ramps to get one end of the tractor up in the air a bit, and last but not least a dry place to work. Heat is good as well. I froze my hands so many times working on snowmobiles when I was younger that I seem susceptible to frostbite now.
 

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I have 3 air compressors. One is 5hp 80 gallon upright and 2 stage, when I run my blast cabinet it still runs non stop, with the cabinet and maintains 90 psi the whole time, let it deadhead and shut off on the pressure switch it builds up to 175. It's a 4 cylinder pump, 18 cfm at 175. Something like 22-23 cfm at 90 psi. Other than my 2 post lift and my Miller mig the best money I've spent on tools and equipment in the garage.
My other 2 compressors are gas powered and on wheels. One Emglo brand (same as my big upright) and one Quincy. Both of these are single stage. My son has pretty much claimed the Emglo, I haven't seen it (other than at his house) in 3-4 years. Super convenient though when I need air on the road somewhere.
 

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Yeah I know about frostbite from my younger years. My hands now go numb just riding my Harley if it's below about 55* outside and I forgot to grab gloves ... Especially my left hand. Otherwise they both go numb without gloves when I'm outside very long below about 25* whether in doing anything out there or not....
 
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