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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just purchased a Gardener with cast iron split rims. I have two new tires for it. Which is the best way to get the old ones off and the new ones on ? The conventional way on a tire changer or splitting the two piece rims and mount the tires and tube and bolt the rims back together again?
 

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I just purchased a Gardener with cast iron split rims. I have two new tires for it. Which is the best way to get the old ones off and the new ones on ? The conventional way on a tire changer or splitting the two piece rims and mount the tires and tube and bolt the rims back together again?
If you decide to take them apart be careful with the bolts they break off easy. I broke one off myself
 

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From experience with old Gravely two peice rims, you need to break the bead first, then pull the rims apart. Typical split rims don't have the depression to let the tire "walk" over the rim. And break the bead, because usually the tires are stuck tightly to the rim and don't want to let the rim just slide out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the information. You answered my questions and confirmed the fact that the tire would not walk over the rim. Have to get them off and in the basement where it is warm and start the soaking process with PB Blaster. Might try to get them off the tractor this morning as it is a whole 5° out there. Lot better than the -3° a couple days ago.
 

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I put new tires and tubes on the front split rims on my 59 sears suburban. I did split the rims when I removed the old tires and tubes. This is how I reassembled them to guarantee that I would not pinch the tubes between the rim halves. First,install the tire onto the rim half that has the valve stem hole. Second, install the tube into the tire and pull the valve stem through the valve stem hole in the rim. Third slightly inflate the tube to make sure there are no folds in the tube. If the tube looks like it's correctly installed, remove the valve from the valve stem. Fourth (the most important part), take some C clamps and pinch the sidewalls of the tire together until the beads nearly contact each other, but just make sure that the tube is not sticking out from between the tire beads. Fifth, install the other rim half and tighten down the bolts. Now you can release the C clamps, install the valve in the valve stem, and inflate the tire.
If you were to just install the tube in the tire and then try bolting the rim halves together, you would most likely pinch the tube between the rim halves.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I was wondering what a safe way to get them back together would be. I could see pinched tubes all over the place and didn't want that. These are a lot different than the old split rim truck wheels I worked on back in the 50's. I think a bottle of Coke will help get the tire beads loose from the rim too. Used that trick back in the 50's too. Warms Coke worked better than cold. Also works to take the road film off the windshield. I might try white vinegar as it goes right after the rust.
 
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