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Texas Member
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I messed up royal, Ordered 7 yards of concrete and now I have a mess :mad2: . Long story, but sufice to say I have a plan B (sort of). This pad is rougher than the yard it was poured on. Hardend in like 20 minuets in the 100 deg heat barely giving me time to spread most of it out. I plan to buy 82 bags of 80# quickrete and build a 3X4 form and pour 1" squares on top of this. Could someone check my math. Is there a Plan C?

Crying in Texas :wallbanging:
 

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What is this going to be used for? If this is for an out building like mentioned I would consider resurfacing. If not I would form it directly on top making sure each form is level. Start at your highest point just in case you have a drop somewhere then you can simply raise your form to make up the difference.
 

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Tractorholic
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Don't give up , how thick where you trying for 3-4 "? Maybe it would pay to get another load and pour it one shot
 

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Work with what you have. Get a good nights sleep & rest then tackle this freshly minded. Since this will be your shop I would resurface. They are a lot of new products out there that have tremendous bonding agents & self level. Your advantage is this will be sheltered not exposed to the elements & it being a shop. Thirty plus years of construction I feel your pain. With the technology & products we have available today most things can be fixed but you can't give up...get some rest & show us your new floor soon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I am taking a suggestion I received. I don't want to have another $700.00 botched pour due to lack of man power or experance. I am contacting at least (4) local contractors that specialize in concrete repair locally for a quote to fix this. Better spend the extra $$$ and fix it right. I can get the insulation and electrical later.
 

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Red Tractor Nut & Diesel Addict
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I am taking a suggestion I received. I don't want to have another $700.00 botched pour due to lack of man power or experance. I am contacting at least (4) local contractors that specialize in concrete repair locally for a quote to fix this. Better spend the extra $$$ and fix it right. I can get the insulation and electrical later.
I think you are spot-on getting a specialist to do this for you. Self leveling concrete seems to be the way to go. Concrete can be tough to deal with. I do tend to think this batch was off on the mix, so maybe a specialist can verify it one way or another. If it can be proven the mix was bad, then you may get restitution from the concrete company.
 

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Procrastinators unite tomorrow
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I am taking a suggestion I received. I don't want to have another $700.00 botched pour due to lack of man power or experance. I am contacting at least (4) local contractors that specialize in concrete repair locally for a quote to fix this. Better spend the extra $$$ and fix it right. I can get the insulation and electrical later.
Good idea, that is one ugly pour. Hard to tell from here if mix was off, or if it was from the amount of water from hose after the pour.
 

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Red Tractor Nut & Diesel Addict
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On our recent concrete pour for the floor of 2 silage pits and loading area, Dad wanted us to do the job ourselves, just Josh & myself. He estimated 70 yards, but I KNEW he was way off if we wanted a decent level & strong, long lasting floor. Told him we had to hire a crew, and he finally agreed. The pour ended up taking 140 yards!!!!!!! The crew of 8 pro's did a fine job. NO WAY we could have handled that! We also had them apply sealer. Some things you just need to have a pro do, and concrete is one of them most times.
 

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Procrastinators unite tomorrow
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On our recent concrete pour for the floor of 2 silage pits and loading area, Dad wanted us to do the job ourselves, just Josh & myself. He estimated 70 yards, but I KNEW he was way off if we wanted a decent level & strong, long lasting floor. Told him we had to hire a crew, and he finally agreed. The pour ended up taking 140 yards!!!!!!! The crew of 8 pro's did a fine job. NO WAY we could have handled that! We also had them apply sealer. Some things you just need to have a pro do, and concrete is one of them most times.
140 yards :eek:h_shucks: pro's earned there money that day :thumbs:
 

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Bob's Lawn and Garden LLC
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Hate to say it but from the pics there is nothing to do other then tear it out and start over. One thing you could look into is if the load was hot when it got there. You need to call the company that brought it and ask them to send a rep out with the batch weights and batch time on them. Also did you put plastic down first or at least wet the ground first as the dry ground will just suck the water out fast. Also did you do a little at a time or just poured a bunch out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Hate to say it but from the pics there is nothing to do other then tear it out and start over. One thing you could look into is if the load was hot when it got there. You need to call the company that brought it and ask them to send a rep out with the batch weights and batch time on them. Also did you put plastic down first or at least wet the ground first as the dry ground will just suck the water out fast. Also did you do a little at a time or just poured a bunch out.
I had a full vapor barrior (tarps) and hosed it down prior to the pour. Unfortunally I had my wife adding water in hopes to keep it pliant while I raked it out. Too much water may have been used on my part. I can't affort to tear it out, The budget for the whole shop is now shrinked to doing Insulation and Electrical 2 years from now (end of the loan to complete the whole shop)
 

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I am taking a suggestion I received. I don't want to have another $700.00 botched pour due to lack of man power or experance. I am contacting at least (4) local contractors that specialize in concrete repair locally for a quote to fix this. Better spend the extra $$$ and fix it right. I can get the insulation and electrical later.
Best decision you'll ever make, time to cut your losses and fix the problem right. If you do have to bust it up, you'll have some crusher for the drive or to raise/fill the pad
 

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Tractorholic
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I friend whom does mansory work used that resurfacer yeasr ago on his aunt patio that the whole top layer over the year came off ( spalding ? ) he said it came out great , how that's all your going to need . And I know how you feel , I HATE concrete work !!! I've NEVER did any by myself that I was happy with . I can help place it but when it come to getting the right finish I stink lol
 

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I have been involved with concrete work for many years. First thing is that temperature makes a huge difference. On 90 degree or above days I won't pour. Concrete cures by a chemical process not drying as most people think. The higher the temp the faster it sets and then cures. I've been told of ice used in the trucks to cool down the load(at extra cost). Another problem is that it has to have adequate water to cure to full strength. That is why good concrete crews will pour jobs like this first thing in the morning. They will cover it to keep water in and excess heat out.

You will probably see this slab crack in numerous places in the next two weeks. Depending on how much it cracks and how soft the concrete feels( I test existing concrete with a geologists pick to get and idea of the strenght) you can then decide whether to pull it out or just pour over it.

When doing any kind of constuction work the 7 Ps always apply. Concrete trucks don't actually deliver a yardage. The ticket will really be for a tonnage. I always add 10% to the order because its better to have a bit left over. If there is limited manpower break the job into small manageable pours. Joints in a slab are not a problem if you use rebar and a properly designed joint. Use strong forms and set them so that you are pouring to the top of the forms. The top of the form should be smooth and unobstructed so that you can use it as a screed guide. This will save alot of time and labor. Use a vibrator when placing the concrete to prevent voids but do not over vibrate.

That slab size looked to me like there should have been atleast three men on the crew. I made the mistake of my wife and I trying to pour a 3 cy grout pour oursleves. It was too much. Fortunately the driver(a Marine) got out of the truck and gave a hand. Gary had been to our house(under constuction) many times because I used about 200 cy in our house.

Always get the ticket from the driver and read it before signing. In 2008 I poured about 700 truck loads and on atleast 5 trucks they had sent the wrong type of concrete. We were building bridges and needed the high strenght.

I was taught in the 1950s that it is cheaper and easier to work with nature. I prefer to pour concrete in cool weather. When the daytime high is around 70 is perfect. Higher or lower temperatures adds to cost and usually increases risks to the quality of the job. In you case, I would water and cover that slab. Check it several times a day to make sure it is wet. This may help reduce cracking and increase the strength. After a few weeks you can evaluate whether it is worth covering or should just be removed.

I realize that this has been long and complicated. Unfortunately, doing good concrete work is complicated. Good Luck, Rick

I looked at the pics again and realized that you are keeping it wet. That is great. You may be able to pour a topping on that but I would still wait to see how strong the slab is. Pressure wash it and you may be able to put welded wire mesh over the existing slab and pour over that.
 

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Larry, I have a couple of buddies that do concrete work and hearing about the problems they go through during a pour I can see how you ran into problem. You think pouring concrete would be fairly simple but in reality it is a profession and an art. I think your decision to get a couple of pro's to look at it is a wise one. I know when they poured my slab there was a crew of 6. Best of luck!
 
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