Garden Tractor Forums banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Tractorholic
Joined
·
3,097 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·

·
Tractorholic
Joined
·
3,097 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Anybody ?

<bump>
 
  • Like
Reactions: Gabriel

·
Registered
Joined
·
254 Posts
No, but I'm anxious to hear your review of it! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,880 Posts

·
Tractorholic
Joined
·
3,097 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Got the book this afternoon, I've only spent a few minutes leafing through it. I'll post more thoughts on it once I've had a chance to read it.
 

·
Tractorholic
Joined
·
3,097 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I've had a chance to read through this book now and share some thoughts.

1) Chapters 1 though 6, roughly 80 pages, feature a few first hand accounts of a non-technical description of the improved features of the new tractors, the actual rollout of the tractors, a few accounts of how reliable operators found the new tractors, and some other personal anecdotes about Massey's international operations.

2) Chapter 7 is a series of photos of 1xx series tractors working and resting from the Massey Archives.

3) Chapter 8 is a bit of a training guide on how to demonstrate the new tractors to potential customers.

4) Pages 128 to 311 consist mostly of dimensional data and pictures of the different tractors. While the data is logically organized, with base models listed first, then the variations, I was disappointed to find only dry data, with no discussion about why the "vineyard" or "orchard" or "high clearance" models were modified in their respective fashions.

5) It was very interesting to glean a bit of information about the kits which converted these tractors from two-wheel drive to 4-wheel drive and the resulting changes to the tractor. To summarize, the kits would either attach to the PTO which would be used in ground-speed mode rather than engine mode, or an adapter/spacer would be inserted into the frame behind the transmission and power would be used from there, in which case the tractor would be 7 inches longer and the turning radius would change slightly as well. I once found a magazine article which talked about modifications to the 145, 175 and I think the 185 tractors which added a spacer which increased the wheelbase leading to better handling of heavy implements and increased clearance for the driver. The new series was badged as the 148, 178, and 188. I wonder which came first, the idea of the spacer for the xx8 tractors, or if someone at MF noticed the other positive effects of the adapter kit on tractor handling. While those tractors were specifically mentioned in the article, I also found in the dimensional data a 158 and a 168 which appear to have been modified in this fashion also.

I found myself somewhat disappointed by this book. As can be seen from point 4, the vast majority of this book is little more than tables of information about engines, transmissions, overall dimensions, tires and fluid capacities. Although as noted, the information is organized logically into "families" such as the "130 family", it simply lists the tractors in numerical order, any variations available, and no timeline or reasons offered as to why the basic 135 diverged into a 130,132,133, 134V, and 139 tractors.

While the personal anecdotes are interesting, they revolve more around operations and details of the unveiling of the "Red Giants" and cover little if any of the design decisions which led to the initial release of these tractors and the development of all the variations on the design. So, for someone looking for information surrounding the unveiling of these tractors and raw data about the designs of the 100 series tractors, this book will fit the bill.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top