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Only member from Western South Dakota!
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Yeah that's a sweet truck. I have 2 GMC's from that era. Go out and try to find a late model half ton, two wheel drive pickup with 36,000 miles on it for 6900 bucks. Ain't gonna happen. If I was in the market it would be a truck I would persue!

Later---DAC
 
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Tractorholic
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I remember the days - having to mount customer equipment under the seat instead of behind it . Gettting the stuff out for repair was a fun time also . Can anybody say - static display ? Not being grumpy - just historical .
 

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Collector of Rusty Junk
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The 307 will probably use less fuel than the 250 would. I used to have a 307 in a '70 Malibu that I tortured and I couldn't make it get less than 16 mpg's. 307's were so much better than the 305's that replaced them.
VERY NICE pickup!
The 307 is a 283 bore and a 327 stroke. Basically a 327 crank in a 283 block. That is why it runs so good the shorter stroke makes it accelerate faster than a 305.

A 305 is a 350 with a smaller bore.
 
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Many of the early 307s had problems. I remember in 1971 that there was a rash of them that had to be replaced with less that 40,000 miles. At the same time the newer Volvos were having a rash of engine failures. One of the 60+ year old mechanics I was working with said that the steel had changed and that they weren't ageing the castings. Either way, I have avoided GM engines made 68 to 72 for 40 years.

My 73 1500 Suburban with a 350 and three on the tree got 18 mpg on the highway. My 65 Nova Wagon with a 230 and 3 on the tree got 23.7 mpg from CT to CA and back in 1975. Good Luck, Rick
 

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Anything Red . . .
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The 307 is a 283 bore and a 327 stroke. Basically a 327 crank in a 283 block. That is why it runs so good the shorter stroke makes it accelerate faster than a 305.
The 307 was an early attempt at a smog engine. The 327 was soooo much better.

Many of the early 307s had problems. I remember in 1971 that there was a rash of them that had to be replaced with less that 40,000 miles.......the steel had changed and that they weren't ageing the castings. Either way, I have avoided GM engines made 68 to 72 for 40 years.
In the day, I never heard of such a thing. I must have had a dozen vehicles that never heard of it either!
 

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I worked for an Auto Parts store by day and a gas station evenings and weekends. I came across alot of people and was offered a bunch of 307s for free. I was drag racing a 64 Chevelle with a 283. I checked out what everybody was throwing out on the chance that it was an upgrade from my car. It was our machinist that told me about the change in the way the steel was cutting and he was seeing blocks that were warpped. I stuck with my older stuff. Good Luck, Rick
 

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Homelite Owner Extraordinaire
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Had one nearly like that back in 72. Had a problem with the cam. Soft lobes. GM replaced the engine and it ran for a long time for me. Worst thing I did to it was take it to Earl Schibe in Detroit for a paintjob."..... $99 any cart, any truck any color...." Yup, sure did painted headlights, tail lights, side marker lights, turnsignals, even the rear window. I really liked the truck drove it for work and as my daily driver. Was still running last I knew in the early 90s. Had a lot of rust. Roger.
 

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I've heard of soft cams many times, even on recent B&S Intek engines. Cams are easy enough to change. It used to take most of a day to change the cam on my brothers 69 SS 396 Chevelle. I was dealing with older cars. I'd have been mad if it was a new car. Good Luck, Rick

I always did my own painting after my father had an Earl Shibe job done on his Ford. They taped it up okay but didn't clean it to well before painting. The materials cost me less than $50 to paint a car so it would be a weeknd project. I used acrylic lacquer and would wet sand and buff it out after a week.
 

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Collector of Rusty Junk
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The 307 was an early attempt at a smog engine. The 327 was soooo much better.!
The 307 came out way before ny smog motor, they were built from 1968 to 1973. They were built to replace the 283.
 
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Collector of Rusty Junk
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I do know the original sm block Chevy the 265 had a lot of problems back in 1955, it was mostly valve train related.
 
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Only member from Western South Dakota!
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Be careful. Those odemeters only went to 99,999 miles, so it could be 136,000 miles. Those were also easy to change. Good Luck, Rick
Yeah the odometer could be rolled over. I have been driving this era if trucks for 42 years and still own the first one. Also have a '72 we bought in '79. I ain't an expert but I have a gut feeling about how they deteriorate. I think this one would cost more than they are asking if they took a 136,000 mile truck and detailed it to look like a 36,000 mile truck. Looking at the interior wear, steering wheel cracks, amount of paint that came off the engine when steam cleaned, and other details leads me to believe it's authentic but if someone went thru all that work and money to make it look that good it's still may be a decent deal. I'm guessing that the buy it now price is very negotiable too.

The 307 will probably use less fuel than the 250 would. I used to have a 307 in a '70 Malibu that I tortured and I couldn't make it get less than 16 mpg's. 307's were so much better than the 305's that replaced them.
VERY NICE pickup!
I think the 307 got a bad rap early on mainly because of old purists that thought the 283 could never be matched and in some ways that's probably true. I agree that great milage could be gotten from them along with decent small v-8 power!

The 307 is a 283 bore and a 327 stroke. Basically a 327 crank in a 283 block. That is why it runs so good the shorter stroke makes it accelerate faster than a 305.

A 305 is a 350 with a smaller bore.
Yeah, its been since the late 70's and early 80's we raced a class at our local dirt track that had a 301cubic inch limit. The preferred block was the 307 using a '68 or 69 283 crank as they were large journal. If I remember correctly the 307 block was 10 or 12 pounds lighter than the 283, and held up great. I think at .060 over it came out about 292 cu. in. Don't quote my faded memory on that one tho---LOL!

Later---DAC
 
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the homeless tractor hoarder
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The 307 came out way before ny smog motor, they were built from 1968 to 1973. They were built to replace the 283.
Churchill Truck Lines bought a brand new red '68 pickup for the shop to use at the main headquarters here in Chillicothe, MO. It was set up for California emissions with a full-on belt driven smog pump. It had a 307 and got 6 to 8 MPG's, didn't have any power, and absolutely drank oil from new. After about 20,000 miles the smog pump locked up so it was removed and all lines plugged. The truck ran much better and got just shy of 20 MPG and oil consumption stopped that day. My dad put a ton of miles on that truck chasing and repairing broken down semi's.
 
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